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At the Yellowstone Conference Center in Big Sky, Montana, March 01 – March 08, 2025

  • David Woerner

    Project Manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: JPL Lead for RPS Systems Engineering and Integration activities for NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems Program. Editor, The Technology of Discovery: Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Thermoelectric Technologies for Space Exploration. Previously, David was the Systems Formulation Manager for the Radioisotope Power System Program at NASA and earlier the Chief Engineer of the avionics for Mars Pathfinder. 40 years of experience at JPL and the Laboratory of Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, including work on the Galileo, Cassini, and Magellan missions. Chair, Board of Directors of IEEE Aerospace Conferences. Numerous NASA awards, including the Exceptional Service and Exceptional Achievement Awards.

  • Kendra Cook

    , : Senior Systems Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Owner/Principal of C2 International. Served 7 years as an Officer in the U.S. Air Force, specializing in UAVs and air-launched weapons systems. Prior work includes NOAA’s Lead Systems Engineer on the COSMIC-2 joint US-Taiwan satellite program, design of UAV prototypes at the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency, and Information Assurance for the Navy’s Distributed Common Ground System. B.S. in Aerospace Engineering, Boston University; M.S., Astronautical Engineering and Computer Engineering, Air Force Institute of Technology.

    • Steven Arnold

      Deputy Executive, Civil Space, Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory: Deputy Executive, Civil Space, Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory. Oversees all Civil Space programs at APL, including missions such as NASA's New Horizons, Parker Solar Probe, and Dragonfly. Responsible for strategic activities such as core technology development, internal research and development, external partnering programs, program formulation, and program execution. Formerly held senior technical and management positions at Hughes and DirecTV. BS, Electrical Engineering, Virginia Tech; MS, Electrical Engineering, Purdue University.

    • Keyur Patel

      Associate Director for Flight Projects and Mission Success, NASA Jet Propulsion Lab: Keyur Patel is currently the Director for Astronomy and Physics at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and represents the Directorate as a member of JPL’s Executive Council. He is responsible for all aspects of research, technology, development and operations, program planning, formulation and development, and execution of the Directorate’s missions. He has held positions as the Deputy Director for Planetary Science, Director for the Interplanetary Directorate, Deputy Director for Office of Safety and Mission Success. As Project Manager for Dawn, he shepherded the mission through its launch to orbit and study the protoplanets Vesta and Ceres. He served as Deputy Project Manager and Chief Engineer for the Deep Impact mission, helping to ensure the spacecraft’s successful encounter with comet Tempel 1.

    • 2.01 Current Space and Earth Science Missions

      Addresses status and results of missions in development, implementation, and operation. Session objective is to provide a full mission prospective and discuss the system level trade offs, challenges and lessons learned. From operational missions, results are discussed along with the in-flight challenges. Session addresses all types of missions from Earth orbiting to planetary to heliophysics to astrophysics missions.

      • James Graf

        Director, Earth Science and Technology Directorate, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Director for Earth Science and Technology Directorate at JPL. Formerly, Manager of JPL's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project and the Quick Scatterometer Mission, an Earth-orbiting satellite. Recipient of NASA's Outstanding Leadership Medal and Aviation Week's 1999 'Laurel for Space.' BSE, Princeton University; MS, Colorado State University.

      • Nick Chrissotimos

        Associate Director of Flight Projects Code 430, NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center: Associate Director of Flight Projects for Planetary Science Projects Division at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Directs the development and implementation of over multiple flight projects.

      • Keyur Patel

        Associate Director for Flight Projects and Mission Success, NASA Jet Propulsion Lab: Keyur Patel is currently the Director for Astronomy and Physics at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and represents the Directorate as a member of JPL’s Executive Council. He is responsible for all aspects of research, technology, development and operations, program planning, formulation and development, and execution of the Directorate’s missions. He has held positions as the Deputy Director for Planetary Science, Director for the Interplanetary Directorate, Deputy Director for Office of Safety and Mission Success. As Project Manager for Dawn, he shepherded the mission through its launch to orbit and study the protoplanets Vesta and Ceres. He served as Deputy Project Manager and Chief Engineer for the Deep Impact mission, helping to ensure the spacecraft’s successful encounter with comet Tempel 1.

    • 2.02 Future Space and Earth Science Missions

      Future space or Earth science programs or missions in formulation or concept development.

      • Alex Austin

        Systems Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Alex Austin is a Systems Engineer in the Advanced Design Engineering group at JPL. He is the Flight System Systems Engineer for the INCUS mission, as well as the Lead Engineer for Team Xc, JPL’s formulation team for CubeSat and SmallSat missions. He received a bachelor’s degree in Aeronautical and Mechanical Engineering and a master’s in Aeronautical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

      • Michael Gross

        Project Manager, GRACE-C Project, NASA Jet Propulsion Lab: Michael Gross started his career at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in August of 1996. Mike has served as the GRACE Project Mission Assurance Manager, the Deputy Mission Assurance Manager of the MER Project, the Phoenix Mars Lander Project Payload Manager, Assistant Division Manager for Flight Projects of JPL's Autonomous Systems Division, Manager of the Power and Sensor Systems Section, Deputy Project and Flight System Manager of the GRACE-FO Project, and Manager of the Autonomous System Division. In 2021 Mike, along with three colleagues, was awarded the AIAA International Cooperation Award for “outstanding leadership of the international consortium in the planning and implementation of the successful Earth gravity missions.”. Mike is currently the Manager of the GRACE-C Project. He is an AIAA Associate Fellow, a Senior Member of the IEEE, and a Corresponding Member of the IAA

    • 2.03 System and Technologies for Landing on Planets, the Moon, Earth and Small Bodies

      This session includes landing spacecraft, including precision and safe landing, atmospheric entry, descent, and landing/rendezvousing with small bodies.

      • Ian Clark

        Systems Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Ian is a systems engineer in the Internal Build Mission Project Systems Engineering Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He currently serves as the Mars Ascent Phase Lead for the Mars Sample Return Mission. He has previously served as a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology and PI of NASA's LDSD and ASPIRE projects.

      • Clara O'Farrell

        Guidance and Control Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Clara O’Farrell is an engineer in the Entry, Descent, and Landing Guidance and Control Systems Group at JPL. She received a PhD in Control and Dynamical Systems from Caltech in 2013, and a BSE in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University in 2008. Since joining JPL in 2013, she has worked on the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerators and Mars 2020 projects. She is the recipient of JPL's Charles Elachi Award and the NASA Early Career Exceptional Public Achievement Medal.

    • 2.04 Robotic Mobility and Sample Acquisition Systems

      Use of robotic systems for in situ space exploration involving robotic mobility, manipulation, and sampling. All aspects of these robotic systems - including design, development, implementation, validation and operation - are valued topics of presentation. Research prototypes as well as fielded or flown systems are of interest.

      • Richard Volpe

        Directorate Technologist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Manager of the Mobility and Robotic Systems Section (347) at JPL. Key section capabilities include vision, sensor processing, advanced controls, man-machine interfaces, simulation, and system design, primarily for rovers. Research interests include natural terrain mobile robots, real-time sensor-based control, manipulation, robot design, software architecture, and path planning.

      • Paul Backes

        Group Supervisor, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Paul Backes, Ph.D. is the Group Supervisor of the Robotic Manipulation and Sampling group at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, where he has been since 1987. He received the BSME degree at U.C. Berkeley in 1982 and Ph.D. in ME from Purdue University in 1987. His awards include NASA Exceptional Engineering Achievement Medal (1993), JPL Award for Excellence (1998), NASA Software of the Year Award (2004), IEEE Robotics and Automation Technical Field Award (2008), NASA Exceptional Service Award (2014), and Purdue University Outstanding Mechanical Engineer Alumni Award (2021).

      • Joseph Bowkett

        Robotics Technologist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Joseph Bowkett, Ph.D., is a Group Lead and Robotics Technologist researcher in the Mobility & Robotics Systems section of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. His past work on autonomous robotic manipulation includes convoy path clearing for the Army Research Laboratory's "Robotics Collaborative Technology Alliance," drilling and sample collection for the proposed Europa Lander mission, mobility in complex terrains in the Exobiology Extant Life Surveyor (EELS) research task, and others. Joseph's current work involves developing novel 'in-contact manipulation' behaviors for the MSR Sample Return Lander's "Sample Transfer System" that will place each sample tube into the Mars Ascent Vehicle.

    • 2.05 Future Missions & Enabling Technologies for In Situ Exploration, Sample Returns

      Future mission concepts, planetary protection technologies, sample handling techniques, novel technologies for in situ exploration, technologies not covered under robotic mobility and sample acquisition, human precursor mission concepts, and technologies that enable precursor missions.

      • Elena Adams

        Systems Engineer, Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory: Elena Adams is a Principal Staff at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. She received a B.S. from University of Virginia; an M.S. and Ph.D., and an M.E. from the University of Michigan. Since joining APL in 2008, she worked on Van Allen Probes, ExoMars MOMA, Europa Clipper, Parker Solar Probe, and most recently led the DART team as a Mission and Spacecraft Systems Engineer. She is currently the Dragonfly Lander Systems Engineer. She has worked with NOAA and Planetary Defense Coordination Office on a number of studies for future mission architectures and survey approaches, and on a variety of instrument and spacecraft technologies. She won NASA grants for developing technology for future space exploration, including a hopping lander to explore asteroids and a sampling system for collecting water from Enceladus, a moon of Saturn. She participates on multiple flight project standing review boards.

      • Christopher Green

        Assistant Chief for Technology, NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center: Mr. Christopher Green serves as the Assistant Chief for Technology within the Electrical Engineering Division at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

    • 2.06 In Situ Instruments for Landed Surface Exploration, Orbiters, and Flybys

      This session solicits papers that describe advanced instrument concepts and/or innovative analytical protocols that enable the characterization of surface and subsurface chemistry and geology (elemental, isotopic, molecular, mineralogical composition), astrobiological potential, geophysical processes (tectonics, internal structure, heat flow, geochronology), atmospheric chemistry and dynamics, dust and particles, charged particles/plasmas, and magnetic fields.

      • Xiang Li

        Research Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center: Xiang Li received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the Johns Hopkins University in 2009. He is a mass spectrometry scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. His research focuses on the detection of trace element and astrobiologically relevant organic molecules in planetary systems, such as Mars, Europa and Titan. He is especially interested in the instrument development of time-of-flight and ion trap mass spectrometers with various ionization and ion gating techniques.

      • Jacob Graham

        Research Space Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center: Jacob Graham is a Research Space Scientist in the Planetary Environments Lab at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. He received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the Johns Hopkins University and was a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Chicago. As an instrumentalist his research interests broadly includes mass spectrometry, ionization processes, laser desorption and molecule-surface interactions.

      • Terry Hurford

        Scientist, : Planetary scientist

    • 2.07 Mission Design, Formation Flying and Constellations

      This session covers all aspects of mission design for spacecraft flying to or about Earth, other celestial bodies and deep space. A specific interest is devoted to missions involving distributed systems, as formation flying and constellations. Papers dealing with preliminary and advanced design, actual mission implementation and operational issues are welcome.

      • Giovanni Palmerini

        Professor, Guidance and Navigation, Sapienza Universita' di Roma: Full professor of Aerospace Systems at Sapienza Univ. of Rome, has been working after graduation in 1991 as aeronautical engineer for Italspazio, then back to university (PhD in 1996), visiting scholar at Stanford, later - as researcher at Sapienza - participant in design, test and launch (2000) of UNISAT, first Italian university microsatellite. Currently co-leader of the Guidance and Navigation Lab, working on testbeds for proximity space ops. Research interests in orbital dynamics, space systems, satellite/inertial/integrated navigation. PhD Aerosp.Eng., Univ.Rome (1996). Senior Member AIAA, Member IEEE, ION and AIdAA. Corresponding Member (2016) and lifetime Member (2020) of the International Academy of Astronautics.

      • Leonard Felicetti

        Senior Lecturer in Space Robotics and GNC, Cranfield University: Dr. Leonard Felicetti is a Senior Lecturer in Space Robotics and GNC at Cranfield University (UK). He obtained his Ph.D. and he was a Post-Doc Researcher in Sapienza - University of Rome (Italy). In 2015, he was Honorary Research Associate at University of Glasgow (UK) and then, Associate Senior Lecturer in On-board Space Systems in Luleå University of Technology (Sweden). He joined Cranfield University (UK) in 2019. Leonard's main research interests are on Spacecraft Formation Flying; Guidance, Navigation and Control; Spacecraft Orbital and Attitude Control; Space Robotics; Autonomous Distributed Space Systems; Spacecraft and Mission Design.

      • Ryan Woolley

        Mission Design Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Ryan Woolley is a mission design engineer in the Inner Planet Mission Analysis group at JPL. His focus has primarily been on early mission formulation for the Mars Exploration Program. This includes mission concept studies, systems engineering, propulsion systems, low-thrust trajectories and optimization, mission design tools, and launch vehicle performance. He has worked on nearly all aspects of the Mars Sample Return campaign and has recently begun focusing on small missions to Mars. He received a B.S. in Physics-Astronomy from Brigham Young University, an M.S. in Astronautical Engineering from the University of Southern California, and a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Colorado. He has been at JPL since 2005.

    • 2.08 Space Radiation and its Interaction with Shielding, Electronics and Humans

      The mitigation of adverse effects from radiation on humans and electronics in space is a critical step in mission success. This session focuses on research in understanding the nature of the radiation field in space and how that field is changed as it passes through shielding materials, electronics, and the human body. Topics include radiation measurements made in space, projectile and target fragmentation measurements and materials studies conducted at accelerator facilities on ground, radiation transport modeling, improvements of nuclear reaction models and radiation transport codes, shielding of electronics and humans, and benchmarking of measurements performed both in space and on ground for the verification and validation of the transport codes.

      • Lembit Sihver

        Professor Dr., TU Wien and NPI of the CAS: Dr. Sihver is the Co-founder and CTO for Cosmic Shielding Corporation (CSC), GA, USA. He as around 35 years experience of teaching, and international R&D in space radiation protection, dosimetry, medical radiation physics, nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, material science and nuclear engineering. He has been the principle investigator for simulations and analyses for many experiments at the International Space Station (ISS) in close collaboration with NASA, EU, ESA, JAXA and Roscosmos. Dr. Sihver is an adjunct Professor at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, University of Houston, Roanoke College, East Carolina University, and Texas A&M University, USA, the Royal Military College of Canada, Canada, TU Wien, Austria, Sunway University, Malaysia, and at the Medical College of Soochow University, China. Dr. Sihver is an editor and co-editor for many international recognized scientific journals. He is also an official peer reviewer for many international research funding organizations, as well as for more than 40 different international scientific journals. Dr. Sihver has authored and published around 400 scientific and technical articles and abstracts in peer-reviewed international journals, books, and international conference proceedings. He has presented his work with more than 400 oral and poster presentations.

      • Ondrej Ploc

        Senior researcher, Nuclear Physics Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences: Ondrej Ploc is a senior researcher at the Nuclear Physics Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Department of Radiation Dosimetry in the group “Mixed radiation fields” focusing on the detection and dosimetry of high energy radiation with various applications in the research of new atmospheric phenomena, medicine, civil aviation, and in space. He graduated in nuclear engineering from the Czech Technical University in Prague where he also obtained his Ph.D. in 2009. He spent two years of a postdoc fellowship in Japan, Chiba, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, and a one-year postdoc fellowship in Sweden, Göteborg, Chalmers University of Technology. He is a member of ISO/TC85/SC2 WG21 Dosimetry for Exposures to Cosmic Radiation in Civilian Aircraft. He is the PI of the Research Center of Cosmic Rays and Radiation Events in the Atmosphere and several other projects focused on cosmic rays and atmospheric radiation detection and dosimetry at high-altitude observatories, aircraft, and spacecraft. He is a member of the EURADOS group, involved mostly in WG11 as a leader of Task 8 (Radiation dose induced by natural electric discharge in the atmosphere).

    • 2.09 Space Debris and Micrometeoroids: The Environment, Risks, and Mitigation Concepts and Practices

      Operational satellites are at risk from collisions with the more than 20,000 trackable debris objects that remain in orbit today, as well as hundreds of thousands of objects, including micrometeoroids, that are too small to be cataloged. Beyond the realm of Earth-oriented orbits, unique and immensely valuable science-gathering spacecraft can also be exposed to similar hypervelocity collisional risks, but from cometary and asteroidal micro-milliscale particles (dust). Papers are invited that address the space debris population and growth projections; debris and dust characteristics; impact modeling and materials testing; modeling and simulation and/or test results that can lead to quantification of the risks to spacecraft in various orbits and exploration missions; and mitigation strategies including debris removal or repositioning, spacecraft shielding, orbit selection, and spacecraft operations. Papers documenting past mission anomalies traced to space debris, and mitigation strategies employed today, are also of interest.

      • James Kinnison

        Mission System Engineer, JHU-APL: Jim Kinnison develops mission concepts for the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. He has served as the Mission System Engineer for Parker Solar Probe since the mission concept study began in 2007, and has led the development of more than a dozen concepts, such as Interstellar Probe. He received a B.S. in Physics from Northeast Louisiana University, Monroe, Louisiana in 1984, an M.S. in Physics from Michigan State University, and a PhD in Physics from Clemson University in 2005. He has been with JHU/APL for more than 37 years, where he developed radiation models and worked systems mitigations for radiation effects in microelectronics for more than 10 spacecraft and several long-duration balloon flights. After serving as System Assurance Manager for the New Horizons mission to Pluto, he now focuses on system engineering for scientific space missions and advanced mission concept development.

      • Yasin Abul-Huda

        Space Environmental Effects Modeling and Analysis, Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory: Dr. Yasin Abul-Huda is a senior member of the technical professional staff at the JHU APL where he develops and applies physics-based models to predict space environmental effects. He completed his Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Michigan in 2017. His technical expertise and interests are in the areas of thermal/fluid sciences, combustion, imaging/sensing, and spectroscopy.

    • 2.10 Asteroid Detection, Characterization, Sample-Return, and Deflection

      This Session invites papers on flight and ground system concepts, mission concepts, and technologies that address the need to detect, characterize and deflect asteroids that could pose an impact hazard to Earth. Papers on instrument technologies and technologies for proximity operations near, and landing on, asteroids are also sought.

      • Jeffery Webster

        Senior Systems Engineer, retired, NASA / Caltech / Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Retired Senior Systems Engineer. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Project Support Lead-Project Support Office; Mission Systems Concepts Section-Mars Trace Gas Orbiter; Project Planner & Systems Engineering; Associate Engineer, Mission & Systems Concepts Section. Publications and awards available upon request.

      • Paul Chodas

        Director, Center for Near-Earth Object Studies, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Paul Chodas is a senior scientist at JPL, where he has been computing orbits for asteroids and comets for 40 years. He is the principal architect of JPL's small body core algorithms and software, which is used to determine NEO orbits, propagate their trajectories, and compute their close approaches and Earth impact probabilities. Paul coined the term "keyhole" in connection with asteroid close approaches that lead to later impacts, and he has studied the dynamics of keyholes for asteroids like Apophis and Bennu. Paul leads the team that conducts hypothetical asteroid impact exercises for NASA.

      • Michael Werth

        Senior Scientist, The Boeing Company: Michael Werth received a BS in Physics from the University of Arizona in 2007 and a Ph.D. in Physics from UC Irvine in 2012. Most of his undergraduate and graduate career was spent at CERN working with the Large Hadron Collider’s ATLAS Detector searching for fourth generation quarks and working with data acquisition systems. Michael joined The Boeing Company where he has developed expertise in SAR and EO image processing and additional research interests in deep learning, high-performance computing, and multi-sensor fusion.

    • 2.11 In-Space Robotics: In-Space Servicing, Assembly, Manufacturing, and Active Debris Removal

      On-going and future missions involving in-space robotic systems and operations, to include in-space Inspection, Servicing, Active Debris Removal, Assembly, and Astronaut Assistance. All designs and methods to accomplish robotic tasks in orbit, such as mobility, manipulation, assembly or maintenance, are of interest. Specific aspects may be addressed, such as hardware design, open-loop or closed-loop control, rendezvous trajectory generation, computer vision, autonomy, tele-operation, experimental facilities on the ground, or others of relevance. Mission concept papers are to include technical development toward ground testing or flight operation.

      • David Sternberg

        Guidance and Control Engineer, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory: David Sternberg is a guidance and control systems engineer at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, having earned his SB, SM, and ScD degrees in the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He is currently working on the development and testing of attitude determination and control systems for several satellites including the Psyche mission, as well as the creation of various spacecraft testbeds and simulations. His doctoral work in Space Systems Engineering focused on the development of optimal trajectories for docking to tumbling targets with uncertain properties.

      • Kenneth Cheung

        research scientist, NASA - Ames Research Center: Dr. Kenny C. Cheung serves as a technical lead on advanced materials and manufacturing. As a researcher in the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Intelligent Systems Division, he directs the Coded Structures Laboratory (CSL), which conducts interdisciplinary research at the intersection of design, algorithms, material science, mechanical engineering, and aeronautical engineering. Example work focuses on applying building-block based (digital) materials and algorithms to aeronautical and space applications. This includes shape morphing aircraft and large scale long duration space system infrastructure. Before joining NASA, Kenny received his Ph.D. from the Center for Bits and Atoms at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he showed that digital material strategies can be used to make new kinds of materials (strong and light weight), and new kinds of robots (like transformers). He has numerous papers and patents on topics ranging from high performance composite material manufacturing systems to synthetic protein folding algorithms, surgical devices, and indoor mobile device location systems. He’s particularly fond of applying rapid prototyping to test ideas that can change the status quo in design, based on physical first-principles analyses.

    Technologies, techniques, demonstrations and applications of RF and Microwave systems/components/instruments, and Radio Science

    • Glenn Hopkins

      Principal Research Engineer, Georgia Tech Research Institute: GTRI Fellow and Chief Engineer of the Antenna Systems Division of the GTRI Sensors and Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory, specializing in array antenna technologies. Interests include phased arrays, wide bandwidth antennas, digital beam forming and RF subsystems.

    • James Hoffman

      Vice President of Engineering, Kinemetrics: Quite possibly the only person on LinkedIn who isn’t a “results-orientated team player with excellent interpersonal skills.”

    • 3.01 Phased Array Antenna Systems and Beamforming Technologies

      Included are active power combining, thermal management, phasing networks, integration, power, test and evaluation and beamsteering, algorithm development and associated hardware implementations, and modeling and simulation for all levels of phased array development and beamsteering.

      • Glenn Hopkins

        Principal Research Engineer, Georgia Tech Research Institute: GTRI Fellow and Chief Engineer of the Antenna Systems Division of the GTRI Sensors and Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory, specializing in array antenna technologies. Interests include phased arrays, wide bandwidth antennas, digital beam forming and RF subsystems.

    • 3.02 Ground and Space Antenna Technologies and Systems

      Topics on all aspects of antenna systems associated with space-based sensors or communications. Systems include ground based terminals, ground-to-space and space-to-space data links, and radar sensors. Antenna technologies include reflectors, lenses, feeds, arrays, and the transmit/receive subsystems associated with the antenna(s).

      • James Hoffman

        Vice President of Engineering, Kinemetrics: Quite possibly the only person on LinkedIn who isn’t a “results-orientated team player with excellent interpersonal skills.”

      • David Mooradd

        Technical Staff, MIT Lincoln Laboratory: David Mooradd is a Technical Staff member in the Advanced Concepts & Technology Group at MIT Lincoln Laboratory where he develops antenna and RF systems for radar, and electronic warfare. Prior to joining Lincoln Laboratory in 1995 David worked at Lockheed Martin Syracuse NY developing RF modules for phased array radars, and supporting testing of the Block II GPS antenna farm. He started his career at Millitech Corporation, S. Deerfield MA, as a mm-wave engineer designing antennas, filters, and Gunn diode oscillators. Mr. Mooradd is an active member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) serving on the planning committee for IEEE Symposium on Phased Array Systems and Technology, IEEE Radar Conference, IEEE Antennas and Propagation Symposium, and Chair of the Boston Chapter of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society. David received his BSEE from the University of Lowell, Massachusetts and MSECE from University of Massachusetts Amherst

    • 3.03 RF/Microwave Systems

      Papers about RF and microwave systems or components, passive and active, including radar systems.

      • James Hoffman

        Vice President of Engineering, Kinemetrics: Quite possibly the only person on LinkedIn who isn’t a “results-orientated team player with excellent interpersonal skills.”

      • Orin Council

        Research Engineer, Georgia Tech Research Institute: Mr. Orin H Council received his B.S.E.E from the University of Mississippi in 2007 and a commission in the US Navy as Ensign at the same time. He completed the Navy Nuclear Power Training Program (Qualified Nuclear Engineer Officer) and reported to his first ship USS City of Corpus Christi (SSN 705), a Los-Angeles Class fast attack submarine based in Apra Harbor, Guam in May 2009. After a three years of sea duty and two years of instructor duty at the Naval Submarine School in Groton, CT he completed his military service (LT, USN) and earned an M.S.E.E (2017) from the University of Houston. Mr. Council has designed and built various novel radiator elements in planar phased array antennas for sponsors. He has also works on reflector feed designs for wideband reflector antennas and supports various system analysis programs. Current Fields of Interest Antenna design techniques, electrically small antennas, wideband reflector antenna design

    • 3.04 Radio Astronomy and Radio Science

      Papers on the techniques, hardware, systems, and results in the fields of Radio Astronomy and Radio Science.

      • Mark Bentum

        Professor, Eindhoven University of Technology: Mark Bentum received his MSc and PhD degree in electrical engineering from the University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands, in 1991 and 1995. In 1996 he joined the Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy (ASTRON). He was in various positions at ASTRON. In 2005 he was involved in the eSMA project in Hawaii to correlate the Dutch JCMT mm-telescope with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) of Harvard University. From 2005 to 2008 he was responsible for the construction of the first software radio telescope in the world, LOFAR (Low Frequency Array). In 2008 he became an Associate Professor in the Telecommunication Engineering Group at the University of Twente. In 2017 he became a full Professor at the Eindhoven University of Technology. He is now involved with research and education in radio science. Since 2023 he is the Dean of the Electrical Engineering faculty at Eindhoven University of Technology.

      • Melissa Soriano

        Payload Systems Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Melissa Soriano is a telecom systems engineer in the Flight Communications Section at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She developed real-time and high-performance software for over a decade for the Deep Space Network, including open loop receivers used for radio science and radio astronomy. Melissa specializes in telecom, especially challenging scenarios with low signal strength and high dynamics. She is currently the lead Telecom systems engineer on the Europa Clipper Flight Systems Engineering Team and the X-band Telecom systems engineering lead on the Mars Sample Retrieval Lander Mission. She has a BS from Caltech (double major in Electrical and Computer Engineering and Business Economics and Management) and an MS from George Mason University.

    This track addresses the important topics of communications, tracking, and navigation. Applications may include terrestrial, near-Earth, and deep space applications and involve mature or emerging systems and technologies. We solicit innovative contributions in the areas of communication, tracking, and navigation systems and technologies. Submissions may examine specific new technical breakthroughs, cross-cutting and dual-use technologies, system/network/architecture concepts, as well as mission and experiment profiles.

    • Kar Ming Cheung

      Technical Group Supervisor, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Technical Group Supervisor, Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Principal Engineer and Technical Group Supervisor in the Communication Architectures and Research Section. Over 30 years experience in research, development, production, operation, and management of advanced channel coding, source coding, synchronization, image restoration, and communication analysis schemes. 30+ journal and conference papers. Received NASA's Exceptional Service Medal for work on Galileo's onboard image compression scheme. BSEE, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; MS and PhD, California Institute of Technology.

    • John Enright

      Professor, Toronto Metropolitan University: John Enright is a Professor in Department of Aerospace Engineering at Toronto Metropolitan University (formerly Ryerson University). His primary research interests concern the development of attitude sensors for spacecraft, optical navigation, and mobile robotics.

    • 4.01 Evolving Space Communication Architectures

      A forum in which to trace, examine and predict trends in the architectures of space communications and navigation, including ground infrastructure and support and interactions between terrestrial and space networks. Innovative concepts and game changing approaches with a system view are especially sought.

      • Shervin Shambayati

        Senior Systems Engineering, Aerospace Corporation: Senior Staff at Aerospace Corporation, Communications Architecture Department. Previously, Senior Systems Engineering Specialist, SSL and the Telecommunications Lead for NASA Restore-L program.Former member of Telecommunications Architecture group, JPL. Former Principal Investigator, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Ka-band Demonstration, JPL. BS in Applied Mathematics and Engineering, Cal State University, Northridge. MSEE and PhD, UCLA.

    • 4.02 Communication Protocols and Services for Space Networks

      The focus is communication protocols and services supporting space systems, including ground- and space-based methods to increase efficiency, enable new exploration/applications, provide more secure systems, and improve Quality of Service. Techniques include relay communications, routing, delay/disruption tolerant networking, retransmission approaches, adaptive link/network/transport methods, demand access, and advanced scheduling. Novel space network architectures are of key interest, including microspacecraft swarms, sensor webs, and surface networks. Implementation and evolution of communications networking into space systems, as well as application to specific missions, are sought.

      • Shervin Shambayati

        Senior Systems Engineering, Aerospace Corporation: Senior Staff at Aerospace Corporation, Communications Architecture Department. Previously, Senior Systems Engineering Specialist, SSL and the Telecommunications Lead for NASA Restore-L program.Former member of Telecommunications Architecture group, JPL. Former Principal Investigator, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Ka-band Demonstration, JPL. BS in Applied Mathematics and Engineering, Cal State University, Northridge. MSEE and PhD, UCLA.

    • 4.03 Next Generation Space Systems: AESS GLUE

      This session solicits papers on advanced, interdisciplinary, topics in Space System Engineering, based on the concept of interdependency of systems. This includes new broadband communications systems and techniques, their use platforms, such as small satellites, Internet-of-Remote Things and Internet-of-Space-Things, software control and implementation of sky communications and networks (SDR and SDN), end-to-end system considerations, augmented 3D reality for manned space missions, integration of navigation, communications and sensing functionalities, and advanced signal processing techniques for emerging space communications and data applications.

      • Claudio Sacchi

        Associate professor, University of Trento: Dr. Claudio Sacchi is associate professor at the University of Trento (Italy). His main research interests are in satellite communications and wireless broadband communications. He is authors of more than 120 papers published in international journals and conferences. He is Senior Member of IEEE, member of IEEE Comsoc and IEEE AES society. He ie the chair of the AESS "Glue Technologies for Space Systems" technical panel.

      • Tommaso Rossi

        Eng., University of Rome Tor Vergata: Tommaso Rossi is an Assistant Professor of Digital Signal Processing, Signals Processing for Biomedical Applications and Image and Video Compression at the University of Rome "Tor Vergata." His research activity is focused on EHF (Extremely High Frequency) and UWB (Ultra-Wideband) Satellite and Terrestrial Communication Systems, Digital Beamforming applied to RF Imaging and Telecommunication Systems, DSP for Biomedical Application and Image Processing. He is currently responsible for the Italian Space Agency Q/V-band satellite communication experimets performed through the Alphasat "Aldo Paraboni" P/L.

    • 4.04 Navigation and Communication Systems for Exploration

      Systems, technology, and operations for navigation and/or communication among elements involved in civil, commercial, or national security missions in any orbital domain (Earth and interplanetary). The session focuses on enabling technologies, strategies, new operational concepts and performance improvements for advancing mission capability.

      • Patrick Stadter

        General Manager, Agile Acquisition Division, The Aerospace Corporation: General Manager, Agile Acquisition Division, Aerospace Corp. Research interests include information theory, sensor and data fusion, and space systems science and technology. Experience spanning civil and national security space including cislunar applications and multidomain integrated air and missile defense. BSEE, University of Notre Dame; MSEE, The Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D. Penn State University

      • David Copeland

        Principal Professional Staff, Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory: David Copeland is a member of the Principal Professional Staff of the Space Exploration Sector at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. He is currently the telecommunications flight systems engineer for NASA's Dragonfly mission to Titan. Mr. Copeland has over 35 years' experience in microwave and optical communications. Mr. Copeland received his B.S. from Virginia Tech in 1985 and M.S. from the University of Maryland in 1997, both in Electrical Engineering.

    • 4.05 Relay Communications for Space Exploration

      For a wide range of space exploration scenarios, multi-hop relay communications can provide significant benefits in terms of increased data return and reduced user burden (mass, power, cost) over conventional space-to-ground links. In this session we examine relay communications for both Earth-orbiting missions and missions to the Moon and throughout the solar system. Topics of interest include relay system architecture, relay spacecraft design (for both dedicated relay orbiters and for hybrid science/telecom spacecraft), relay telecommunications payload design, relay communication protocols, mission applications and operational experiences/lessons-learned.

      • Mazen Shihabi

        Technical Group Supervisor, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Mazen Shihabi is the technical group supervisor of the Communications Architecture & Operations Group of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the task manager & operation lead for MRO UHF radio. Prior JPL assignments included modem design and modulation algorithm development. Prior to JPL, he worked for 10 years in aerospace, cellular telecommunications, and remote patient monitoring. Dr. Shihabi is a senior member of IEEE and has published several technical papers and holds several patents related to synchronization algorithms, interference mitigation and physiological alarm notification systems. He received a BS and MS from University of Southern California, and PhD from University of California at Irvine, all in Electrical engineering. Dr. Shihabi has also taught digital signal processing and communications courses at UCI Extension.

      • Jaime Esper

        Project Manager, NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center: Dr. Esper has many years of combined leadership experience in areas covering project management, mission systems engineering, advanced space missions and system concepts, spacecraft systems and technologies, instrumentation, spacecraft design, space mission processing and operations, launch vehicle Range operations, and planetary mission and entry probe design, analysis, and technology development. Dr. Esper has worked on numerous Space and Earth Science and Technology flight projects in capacities ranging from Spacecraft Controller to Project Manager. Dr. Esper is currently the Project Manager of the Lunar Communications Relay and Navigation Systems, enabling an extensible communications and navigation infrastructure in the lunar domain.

    • 4.06 Space Communication Systems Roundtable : Networking the Solar System

      The roundtable will provide a forward-looking view of the development of a Solar System Internetwork - a layered architecture aimed at offering ubiquitous, high-bandwidth communication throughout the solar system in support of robotic and, ultimately, human exploration at the Moon and in deep space. Panelists will assess trends in physical layer capabilities, including migration to higher RF frequencies (Ka-band) and/or to optical wavelengths, as well as higher layers in the protocol stack, including networking protocols such as DTN. Based on assessment of forecasted commercial satcom trends, and building on the multi-hop relay capabilities operating today at Earth and at Mars, the roundtable will describe the evolution towards a true Solar System Internetwork in the coming decades.

      • E. Jay Wyatt

        Program Manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: E. Jay Wyatt currently manages the Space Networking and Mission Automation Program Office within the Interplanetary Network Directorate at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Jay Wyatt has over 30 years of NASA experience on a wide range of assignments with an emphasis on technology developments for mission communication systems, ground data systems, trajectory design & navigation, autonomy development, and mission architecture and design for a variety of mission types including deep space fleets and constellations. His current focus is in leading JPL activities in Disruption Tolerant Networking, automation for NASA’s Deep Space Network, technology developments for NASA's Advanced Multi-mission Operations System, interplanetary CubeSat communication systems, and development of new flight and ground capabilities needed to implement adaptive, on-demand operations to improve how deep space missions are conducted.

      • Alan Hylton

        Network Studies Manager, NASA: Alan Hylton should probably be designing tube audio circuits, but instead directs Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN) research and development at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, where he is humbled to work with his powerful and multidisciplinary team. His formal education is in mathematics from Cleveland State University and Lehigh University, and he considers it his mission to advocate for students. Where possible, he creates venues for mathematicians to work on applied problems, who add an essential diversity to the group.

    • 4.07 Innovative Space Communications and Tracking Techniques

      This session solicits innovative contributions to improve flight and ground communication and tracking systems such as antenna arrays, software-defined radios, advance receivers, deployable antennas, relay satellites, Ka and Optical communications, novel signal formats, new coding methods, and CubeSat communications and tracking techniques.

      • Kar Ming Cheung

        Technical Group Supervisor, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Technical Group Supervisor, Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Principal Engineer and Technical Group Supervisor in the Communication Architectures and Research Section. Over 30 years experience in research, development, production, operation, and management of advanced channel coding, source coding, synchronization, image restoration, and communication analysis schemes. 30+ journal and conference papers. Received NASA's Exceptional Service Medal for work on Galileo's onboard image compression scheme. BSEE, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; MS and PhD, California Institute of Technology.

      • Alessandra Babuscia

        Telecommunication Engineer, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Alessandra Babuscia received a B.S. and a S.M. in Communication Engineering from Politecnico di Milano, Italy in 2005 and 2007 respectively. She received her Ph.D. (2012) at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she worked as research assistant and teaching assistant in Space System Laboratory. She has developed communication system for different university missions (CASTOR, ExoPlanet, TerSat, Rexis, TALARIS). She has worked at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory as summer researcher in Communication Architecture Research Group. Her research interests are in the fields of: communication technologies for small and micro satellite platforms, communication architecture design, statistical risk estimation, expert elicitation, mission scheduling and planning. She was awarded Amelia Earhart Fellows (years 2010 and 2011), Gordon Engineering Leadership Fellows (2010 and 2011), Teaching Assistant Award for MIT AeroAstro Department (2010), Top graduate in B.S program (2005) and in S.M. program (2007) at Politecnico di Milano. She is currently Postdoctoral Research Associate at MIT.

    • 4.08 Communication System Analysis & Simulation

      This session solicits innovative contributions on modeling, analysis, and/or simulation of satellite, aerospace, or terrestrial communication systems. Topics include modeling and design of network services and systems, design and evaluation of communication waveforms, modulations, and coding, modeling of multipath effects in space communications, integration of terrestrial and satellite networks, deep space communication systems, terrestrial and deep space relay space networks, protocols for satellite communication, traffic modeling, traffic engineering and analysis, network optimization and resource provisioning, Delay Tolerant Networking, overlay and virtual networks, cross-layer & cross-system protocol design, and communication network monitoring.

      • Marc Sanchez Net

        Telecommunications Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Marc Sanchez Net is a telecommunications engineer in the Communication Architectures and Research Section at JPL. His research interests include design of space communication systems in challenged environments such as the surface of the Moon or Mars, optical communications, and delay tolerant networking. Marc received his PhD in 2017 from MIT, and holds degrees in both telecommunications and industrial engineering by the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona. He also received the NASA Early Career Award in 2020 and the JPL Explorer Award in 2022.

    • 4.09 Communications and/or Related Systems: Theory, Simulation, and Signal Processing

      This session solicits innovative contributions on theory, modeling and simulation, and signal processing foundations of satellite, aerospace and terrestrial wireless communications.

      • David Taggart

        Engineer, Self: Dr. David Taggart received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles with an emphasis in electrical engineering. He has co-authored about 32 IEEE papers, mostly in recent history. He has worked at Bell Labs, Hughes (Satellite Communications), and TRW Systems. Also, on a part time basis he has taught hundreds of classes at universities and schools in the Los Angeles area. His current interests include digital signal processing and communications analysis and simulations, as well as satellite communication systems.

      • Claudio Sacchi

        Associate professor, University of Trento: Dr. Claudio Sacchi is associate professor at the University of Trento (Italy). His main research interests are in satellite communications and wireless broadband communications. He is authors of more than 120 papers published in international journals and conferences. He is Senior Member of IEEE, member of IEEE Comsoc and IEEE AES society. He ie the chair of the AESS "Glue Technologies for Space Systems" technical panel.

      • Len Yip

        Senior Communication Architecture Analyst, Aerospace Corporation: Len Yip received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from UCLA in 2004. He has been with the Communication Architecture Department at the Aerospace Corporation since 2018. Before that, he was a communication systems engineer at Northrop Grumman Aerospace System for over 14 years. His research interests are communication systems modeling and simulation, communication systems architecture design, and digital signal processing algorithm development.

    • 4.10 Wideband Communications Systems

      This session solicits innovative contributions about wideband communication systems in terrestrial, satellite, and hybrid Space-terrestrial communications systems transmitting information at high data rates. Papers dealing with modelling and simulations of communications systems, evaluating performance, or describing hardware/software implementation of communication system components are welcome. Detailed topics include, but are not limited to: Broadband satellite and aerospace transmission; Broadband terrestrial wireless transmission; Millimeter wave communications; Spread-spectrum and CDMA communications; TV and HDTV broadcasting over satellite; Modulation and channel coding techniques; MIMO techniques; Antenna design; Multi-carrier communications; Multi-user transmission; Channel equalization; Carrier and timing synchronization; Radio resource management and scheduling; Emerging technologies for safety-critical and emergency communications; Emerging standards for terrestrial and satellite communications (LTE, LTE-A, WiMax, DVB-S2, IEEE 802.11x); Energy-efficient terrestrial and satellite communications; and networking.

      • David Taggart

        Engineer, Self: Dr. David Taggart received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles with an emphasis in electrical engineering. He has co-authored about 32 IEEE papers, mostly in recent history. He has worked at Bell Labs, Hughes (Satellite Communications), and TRW Systems. Also, on a part time basis he has taught hundreds of classes at universities and schools in the Los Angeles area. His current interests include digital signal processing and communications analysis and simulations, as well as satellite communication systems.

      • Claudio Sacchi

        Associate professor, University of Trento: Dr. Claudio Sacchi is associate professor at the University of Trento (Italy). His main research interests are in satellite communications and wireless broadband communications. He is authors of more than 120 papers published in international journals and conferences. He is Senior Member of IEEE, member of IEEE Comsoc and IEEE AES society. He ie the chair of the AESS "Glue Technologies for Space Systems" technical panel.

    • 4.11 Software Defined Radio and Cognitive Radio Systems and Technology

      This section presents papers on software and cognitive radio in general, and their application to space communications in particular. Both original and space-centric tutorial papers are welcome.

      • Eugene Grayver

        Principal Engineer, Aerospace Corporation: Engineering Specialist, The Aerospace Corporation; works on flexible communications platforms. Founder, fabless semiconductor company developing low-power ASICs for multi-antenna 3G mobile receivers. Research interests: reconfigurable digital signal processing algorithms, low-power VLSI circuits for communications, and system design of wireless data communication systems. BS, EE, Caltech, Ph.D., UCLA.

      • Genshe Chen

        CTO, Intelligent Fusion Technology, Inc.: Currently, Dr. Chen serves as the Chief Technology Officer at Intelligent Fusion Technologies, Inc., located in Germantown, MD. In this role, he oversees the company’s research and development activities, focusing on government services and commercial solutions.

    • 4.12 Global Navigation Satellite Systems

      This session focuses on recent advances in satellite navigation. Current and future envisioned applications of GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, and Compass global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) are addressed, as well as global, regional and local augmentation systems. The topics covered include next generation GNSSs, receiver technologies, interoperability, orbit computation, multi-sensor fusion, and navigation model, methods and algorithms.

      • Lin Yi

        Technical Group Supervisor, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology: Dr. Lin Yi is a technologist and group supervisor at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. Areas of interest: precision frequency, timing and applications, RF and optical technologies in communications, navigation and radio/optical science applications. Dr. Yi has published more than 30 peer-reviewed journal articles and conference papers.

      • Sriramya Bhamidipati

        Robotics Technologist, NASA Jet Propulsion Lab: Dr. Sriramya Bhamidipati is a robotics technologist at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Before joining JPL, she worked as a postdoctoral scholar in the Navigation and Autonomous Vehicles (NAV) lab at Stanford University. She received her Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 2021, where she also received her M.S in 2017. She obtained her B.Tech. with Honors in Aerospace Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay in 2015. Her research interests include GPS, unmanned aerial vehicles, artificial intelligence, computer vision, power systems, lunar navigation and space robotics.

    • 4.13 Space Navigation Techniques

      Papers in this session are collected on topics of architecture, hardware and algorithms relating to space navigation techniques including, but not limited to: * Ground-based deep space navigation using NASA Deep Space Network, ESA Deep Space Antenna, as well as similar deep space navigation facilities from China, India, Japan, etc. * Navigation at lunar surface and deep space gateway * Navigation in deep space CubeSats missions * Spacecraft formation flying navigation * Navigation in rendezvous missions * Novel navigation methods (e.g. using pulsars) * Relative navigation between spacecraft * Spacecraft navigation with GNSS (Papers accepted under this topic can overlap with the GNSS session topics, and please expect coordination in the final program arrangement) * Spacecraft navigation with in-situ sensors including but not limited to magnetometers, inertial sensors, etc. * Navigation robustness * Autonomous navigation * Integrated navigation

      • Lin Yi

        Technical Group Supervisor, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology: Dr. Lin Yi is a technologist and group supervisor at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. Areas of interest: precision frequency, timing and applications, RF and optical technologies in communications, navigation and radio/optical science applications. Dr. Yi has published more than 30 peer-reviewed journal articles and conference papers.

      • John Enright

        Professor, Toronto Metropolitan University: John Enright is a Professor in Department of Aerospace Engineering at Toronto Metropolitan University (formerly Ryerson University). His primary research interests concern the development of attitude sensors for spacecraft, optical navigation, and mobile robotics.

    • 4.14 CNS Systems and Airborne Networks for Manned and Unmanned Aircraft

      This session focuses on communications, navigation and surveillance systems, including on-board and ground-based systems for all vehicles operating in the National Airspace System (NAS): manned and unmanned vehicles, fixed wing and rotor-craft, general aviation, civil transport and military that may carry passengers, cargo or are performing surveillance-type missions. Topics range from concept development, simulation and modeling, technology development and verification, through flight testing and certification. Emerging fields include surface wireless networks, ADS-B, Datacomm, airborne network security, UAS integration, satellite-based CNS, and international activities.

      • Dylan Hasson

        General Engineer, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center: Dylan Hasson is a General Engineer in the Air Traffic Management Systems Division at the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center) in Cambridge, MA. The ATMS division blends air traffic operations research, information technology, computer science, and engineering expertise focused on developing and deploying systems that help the air transportation enterprise to operate safely and efficiently. Mr. Hasson is a graduate of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute where he received a B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering. He is also a private pilot.

    • 4.15 Aerospace Cyber Security and Cyber-Physical Systems

      Computer networks, information technology, and cyber security are contributing significant advances as well as challenges in aerospace. Systems that integrate with the cyberspace and enable safe, efficient and/or profitable operation and performance, with minimal or no human intervention, are of growing interest. This session focuses on cyber security and privacy developments in the areas including, but not limited to: aerospace software, data and multimedia distribution; air traffic control systems; IVHM; aeronautical and space networked systems; aircraft, airport and airline information systems; UAS/UTM/UAM/AAM, spacecraft and commercial space vehicles; cloud computing, cyber-physical systems, and IoT; and, aerospace cybersecurity regulations and industry standards.

      • Krishna Sampigethaya

        Department Chair and Professor, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University: Krishna Sampigethaya is currently Chair and Professor in the Cyber Intelligence and Security Department at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott, AZ. The department is a DHS/NSA NCAE-C, ABET-Cyber, and a CYBERCOM AEN member. He was the first Associate Director for cyber security at the United Technologies Research Center (2017-2018) and the first Associate Technical Fellow for aviation cyber-physical security at The Boeing Company (2007-2014). He was an Assistant Director for telecommunications program at the University of Maryland ('14-'15). He has introduced cyber security tracks at AIAA, IEEE, and SAE aerospace conferences (2009-present). He has won Best Paper awards at the AIAA/IEEE DASC and I-CNS conferences, ASEI Engineer of the Year Award, ASEI Corporate Engineering Excellence Award, Best Instructor Award at UMD, and ERAU's Faculty Marshal and Distinguished Faculty Awards. He has delivered over 24 keynotes and holds over 24 patents.

    This track focuses on missions, systems, and technologies for small spacecraft, which includes CubeSats, “ESPA-class” spacecraft (generally less than approximately 250 kilograms mass), and more unique small spacecraft (e.g. rovers, helicopters, etc.). In addition, this track seeks papers which focus on mission, systems, and technologies which are lower cost compared to typical large space programs, including educational and university submissions. Submissions are also sought regarding distributed systems (swarms, constellations, etc.).

    • Alex Austin

      Systems Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Alex Austin is a Systems Engineer in the Advanced Design Engineering group at JPL. He is the Flight System Systems Engineer for the INCUS mission, as well as the Lead Engineer for Team Xc, JPL’s formulation team for CubeSat and SmallSat missions. He received a bachelor’s degree in Aeronautical and Mechanical Engineering and a master’s in Aeronautical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

    • Catherine Venturini

      Principal Engineer, The Aerospace Corporation: Catherine Venturini is a Principal Engineer in the Office of the Chief Technology Officer at The Aerospace Corporation. Focus areas include space mission architectures, mission concept development, and small satellite mission capabilities and technology advancements. Catherine has over 15 years of experience in the CubeSats and smallsat community. Her past work includes involvement in the development and operations of 5 Aerospace CubeSat missions, and currently is the PI for the Disksat mission. She leads numerous studies related to small satellite technical trends, mission concepts and capabilities, and new approaches to mission success.

    • 5.01 Small, Low-Cost Missions in Development and Operations for Space and Earth Exploration

      This session will explore the use of small spacecraft and other low-cost implementations to enable new, exciting missions for space exploration. The session will focus on SmallSat and low-cost missions in development and operations and how form factor or other novel approaches can reduce cost and affect the mission.

      • Young Lee

        Technical Group Supervisor and Project Support Lead, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Ms. Young Lee is the Advanced Design Engineering Technical Group Supervisor and Project Support Lead in the Project Systems Engineering and Formulation Section in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She is a member of the NASA’s Small Satellite Coordination Group (SSCG), representing JPL. Over the last 15 years, she has held many diverse leadership positions in NASA programs and projects establishing strategic and collaborative working relationships across many organizations within NASA, including its domestic and international partners. In addition, she has over twenty years of experience in the development and deployment of operations systems for deep space missions, focusing on operations cost reduction, user-productivity improvements and increased information throughput to support many NASA deep space missions. She has M.S. in Management of Information Systems from Claremont Graduate University in California.

      • Benjamin Donitz

        Systems Engineer, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Benjamin P. S. Donitz received his Bachelor and Masters degrees in Aerospace and Space Engineering, respectively, from The University of Michigan. He now works at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the Project System Engineering and Formulation section where he is involved with the development of early-phase mission concepts. Since joining JPL in 2019, Benjamin has worked on several mission concepts and studies evaluating the feasibility of sending dedicated spacecraft to interstellar objects and long period comets. He also works on a variety of other mission and mission concepts including Mars Sample Return and with JPL’s concurrent design and engineering teams, Team-X and A-Team.

      • Lee Jasper

        System Engineer , Space Dynamics Laboratory : Lee Jasper received his B.S./M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in aerospace engineering from CU Boulder. He currently works for the Space Dynamics Laboratory as a Systems Engineer supporting the Air Force Research Laboratory. Lee has worked on many small satellite (including CubeSat) missions as well as the large Earth science mission NISAR managed by JPL-CalTech. His research/work has included orbital debris, controls, astrodynamics, small satellites, aggregating new and existing capabilities into relevant missions, mission assurance, spacecraft autonomy, and workforce development.

    • 5.02 Future Small, Low-Cost Mission Concepts

      This session is focused on small mission concepts and missions in formulation. Missions in all areas of space exploration are welcome, including Earth science, planetary science, astrophysics, and heliophysics.

      • Young Lee

        Technical Group Supervisor and Project Support Lead, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Ms. Young Lee is the Advanced Design Engineering Technical Group Supervisor and Project Support Lead in the Project Systems Engineering and Formulation Section in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She is a member of the NASA’s Small Satellite Coordination Group (SSCG), representing JPL. Over the last 15 years, she has held many diverse leadership positions in NASA programs and projects establishing strategic and collaborative working relationships across many organizations within NASA, including its domestic and international partners. In addition, she has over twenty years of experience in the development and deployment of operations systems for deep space missions, focusing on operations cost reduction, user-productivity improvements and increased information throughput to support many NASA deep space missions. She has M.S. in Management of Information Systems from Claremont Graduate University in California.

      • Dexter Becklund

        Engineering Manager, The Aerospace Corporation: Engineering manager working at Aerospace Corporation for just over 5 years. Worked in a variety of related fields ranging from market and industry research on smallsat technologies, developing and testing prototype CubeSat technology and understanding commercial industry bus capabilities. Now focusing largely on developing and leading efforts within Aerospace to build up digital twins and simulations of smallsat vehicles.

      • Nathan Barba

        Systems Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Nathan Barba is a systems engineer with the Advanced Design Engineering Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He is part of Mars Exploration Program’s (MEP) advanced studies team and is study lead for MEP’s small spacecraft study. His expertise and areas of interest are low-cost mission architectures for Mars exploration. He is a member of the International Mars Exploration Working Group (IMEWG). Nathan received his M.S. in Systems Engineering and his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Arizona State University.

    • 5.03 Lessons Learned from Small Spacecraft Missions

      The past decade has seen major advancements in the development and demonstration of CubeSat and SmallSat technologies and missions. There are many issues and challenges to flying CubeSats and SmallSats successfully, including performance, cost, risk, reliability, fault tolerance, thermal management, radiation hardness, and mission lifetime. University involvement in CubeSat and SmallSat development has provided an excellent training ground for future spacecraft developers. CubeSat and SmallSat technology demonstrations have been experimental and operational. CubeSat and SmallSat technology and mission developments and demonstrations have experienced total successes, partial successes, and, undoubtedly, a few failures. Each success and failure provide opportunities to learn. The objective of this session is to allow CubeSat and SmallSat developers to share their lessons learned, both good and bad, with the CubeSat and SmallSat community.

      • Michael Swartwout

        Professor, Saint Louis University: Michael Swartwout is a professor of aerospace engineering at Saint Louis University. His research focuses on systems and models for improving mission assurance for small spacecraft. He earned his BS and MS in aerospace engineering from the University of Illinois, and his PhD in aeronautics & astronautics from Stanford. While at Stanford, he was the manager of the Sapphire satellite, launched in 2001. At SLU, his students have several CubeSats in development for NASA-sponsored launches: COPPER (2013), Argus (2015), Argus-2 (2019) and DARLA (2024).

      • Bruce Yost

        Director, S3VI, NASA - Ames Research Center: Bruce Yost is currently the NASA Director of the Small Spacecraft Systems Virtual Institute (S3VI), funded by the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). Prior to that, he was the Program Manager for the Small Spacecraft Technology Program within the STMD. He began his aerospace career working on the Space Shuttle at Kennedy Space Center, and also worked at NASA HQs prior to moving to Ames Research Center. Bruce has worked on a number of Shuttle, ISS, and more recently, smallsat missions and programs for over 30 years.

      • John Samson

        Research Affiliate / Aerospace Consultantant, Morehead State University : Dr. Samson has 50+ years experience in onboard processing for space and airborne applications. More than 50 publications in the area of onboard processing systems and architectures. Senior Member IEEE, Associate Fellow AIAA. Graduate of Illinois Institute of Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of South Florida.

    • 5.04 Small Missions as an Educational Opportunity

      This session focuses on CubeSat/SmallSat applications as part of an educational process.

      • Michael Swartwout

        Professor, Saint Louis University: Michael Swartwout is a professor of aerospace engineering at Saint Louis University. His research focuses on systems and models for improving mission assurance for small spacecraft. He earned his BS and MS in aerospace engineering from the University of Illinois, and his PhD in aeronautics & astronautics from Stanford. While at Stanford, he was the manager of the Sapphire satellite, launched in 2001. At SLU, his students have several CubeSats in development for NASA-sponsored launches: COPPER (2013), Argus (2015), Argus-2 (2019) and DARLA (2024).

      • Jin S. Kang

        Associate Professor, U.S. Naval Academy: Dr. Jin S. Kang is an Associate Professor in the Aerospace Engineering Department at the United States Naval Academy, and serves as the Director of the Naval Academy Small Satellite Program. His main research area is in small satellite technology development and was involved in development of four micro-satellites and numerous CubeSat satellites. He received his B.S. from the University of Michigan, M.S. from Stanford University, and Ph.D. from Korea Aerospace University (KAU) in Aerospace Engineering. After working for General Electric for two years, Kang taught at Korea Air Force Academy, KAU, and Drexel University before joining the Naval Academy faculty.

    • 5.05 Instruments and Payloads for Small, Low-Cost Missions

      Payloads and instruments for small spacecraft can bring unique challenges, yet can provide capabilities not previously considered. This Session is focused on all types of instruments and payloads for small missions.

      • Rashmi Shah

        Associate Directorate Technologist for Earth Science and Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology: Interests include technology development, Small Satellites implementation, early concept developments, and science system engineering. Research expertise are in the area of microwave remote sensing, electromagnetic scattering, remote sensing using signals of opportunity reflectometry and microwave remote sensing instrument development.

      • Michael O'Connor

        Major, United States Space Force: Michael O'Connor is a Major in the United States Space Force. His professional experience ranges from space systems to aircraft flight test. He is completing a Department of the Air Force Fellowship at Georgetown University's Center for Security and Emerging Technology where his research focuses on the intersection of autonomy, commercial space, and national security. He will soon be assigned to a program office as a Deputy Branch Chief at Los Angeles Air Force Base in California.

      • Laila Kazemi

        ADCS R&D Engineer , arcsec : Laila Kazemi holds a Doctorate, a Master of Applied Science, and a Bachelor of Aerospace Engineering from Toronto Metropolitan University. She has over 10 years of experience working on small satellite components. As part of her graduate studies, she worked on the ST-16RT star tracker and is credited as a co-inventor. She has contributed to small satellite component research through multiple publications. She currently holds the position of ADCS R&D Engineer at arcsec, where she contributes to star tracker algorithm development, fully integrated ADCS subsystem design, and the space situational awareness and defense domain. Her current project, DeDUST, focuses on the opportunistic detection of space debris through star trackers. The increasing computational capabilities of star tracker microcontrollers, coupled with their integration into the majority of spacecraft buses, present an opportunity to incorporate additional functionality. DeDUST will enable platforms to contribute to clean space guidelines at no extra operational cost or hardware. She is also a key personnel member for the development of a modular, fully integrated ADCS subsystem for nanosats, designed to meet the increasing performance demands and strict timelines of the current smallsat market. The Arcus ADCS will be developed under a GST program and ESA supervision.

    • 5.06 Technologies for Small, Low-Cost Missions

      This session seeks papers covering technologies, systems, and RF components for very small spacecraft (secondary platforms such as CubeSat, ESPA and ASAP-class) that enable "big" science and technology missions on a small budget. Papers that evaluate flight or testing results are strongly encouraged.

      • John Dickinson

        Manager, Research & Development, Flight Edge Compute Systems, Sandia National Laboratories: Experience in spacecraft & payload systems engineering and avionics design & test on Kepler, WISE, JUNO, IBEX, RBSP, MMS, SPP, Solar Orbiter, CYGNSS, and multiple government programs. BSEE, Johns Hopkins University; MSEE, Georgia Institute of Technology.

      • Dimitris Anagnostou

        Associate Professor, Heriot Watt University: Dimitris E. Anagnostou received the BSEE degree from the Democritus University of Thrace, Greece, in 2000, and the MSEE and PhD from the University of New Mexico in 2002 and 2005, respectively. From 2005 to 2006, he was a Post-Doc at Georgia Tech. In 2007, he joined the ECE Department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, where he was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure. He is currently Associate Professor at Heriot Watt University, in Edinburgh, UK. His interests include reconfigurable antennas and arrays for space and wearable applications, RADAR, and wireless vital sign monitoring. Dr. Anagnostou is a recipient of the DARPA Young Faculty Award, the IEEE John Kraus Antenna Award, and is currently supported by the H2020 Marie Curie Individual Fellowship. He is past Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation.

      • Michael Mclelland

        Vice President, Space Systems Division, Southwest Research Institute: Michael McLelland leads Southwest Research Institute’s Space Systems Division, which develops next-generation space missions, systems and enabling technologies to support fundamental space science, national security and commercial applications. Mr. McLelland has over 32 years engineering and management expertise in spacecraft constellations, small satellites, spacecraft avionics, power systems, science payloads and autonomous high-altitude airships. He has played key roles in the development of over 28 spaceflight systems.

    • 5.07 Access to Space for Small, Low-Cost Missions

      Getting to space can be a roadblock for small space missions due to launch costs and availability. This session focuses on the development of adapters (ESPA, PPOD, etc.), new launch vehicles, the acceptance of risk for accommodating secondary or auxiliary payloads and hosted payload options to create opportunities for small mission access to space.

      • Kara O'Donnell

        Principal Director, Aerospace Corporation: Principal Director for the Advanced Research and Engineering at the Aerospace Corporation, providing world class technical support in the areas of adaptive mission assurance, technology planning, development, and test & demonstration.

      • Nicole Fondse

        Systems Director, Aerospace Corporation: Nicole Fondse earned her B. S. in Electrical Engineering and B. S. in Biomedical Engineering from CSU Long Beach in 2005. Upon graduation she joined Northrop Grumman Space Technology. She then earned her M. S. in Systems Engineering and MBA from Loyola Marymount University in 2011. In 2020, Mrs. Fondse transitioned to The Aerospace Corporation where she leads a team supporting the DoD Space Test Program whose responsibility is to provide access to space for military relevant science and technology experiments.

    • 5.08 Applications for Distributed Systems of Small Spacecraft

      This session focuses on distributed systems, swarms, networks, and constellations of small spacecraft, enabling low cost missions while also creating novel opportunities for new capabilities and science.

      • Ryan Woolley

        Mission Design Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Ryan Woolley is a mission design engineer in the Inner Planet Mission Analysis group at JPL. His focus has primarily been on early mission formulation for the Mars Exploration Program. This includes mission concept studies, systems engineering, propulsion systems, low-thrust trajectories and optimization, mission design tools, and launch vehicle performance. He has worked on nearly all aspects of the Mars Sample Return campaign and has recently begun focusing on small missions to Mars. He received a B.S. in Physics-Astronomy from Brigham Young University, an M.S. in Astronautical Engineering from the University of Southern California, and a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Colorado. He has been at JPL since 2005.

      • Ashwati Das-Stuart

        Navigation Engineer, NASA Jet Propulsion Lab: Dr. Ashwati Das-Stuart is a member of the Mission Design and Navigation Section at JPL working on both the NISAR and Europa Clipper missions. She recently transitioned from being a Systems Engineer in the Planning and Execution Systems Operations Section at JPL. Her experience includes systems engineering for operations, software architecting and tool-development, automation, mission design and navigation, artificial intelligence applications and early formulation concept studies. Prior to JPL, she graduated with a Ph.D. focused on artificial intelligence-aided trajectory design in multi-body systems from Purdue University. She loves engaging in outreach efforts to inspire the next generation to join the space journey.

      • Rashmi Shah

        Associate Directorate Technologist for Earth Science and Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology: Interests include technology development, Small Satellites implementation, early concept developments, and science system engineering. Research expertise are in the area of microwave remote sensing, electromagnetic scattering, remote sensing using signals of opportunity reflectometry and microwave remote sensing instrument development.

    Methods to remotely observe and study the environment via stand-off sensors. All aspects of remote sensing system theory, design, and development are considered. This includes system architecture, hardware, software, and algorithms.

    • Jordan Evans

      Project Manager - Europa Clipper Project, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Project Manager, Europa Clipper. Previously the Deputy Director for Engineering and Science at JPL and Division Manager of JPL's Mechanical Systems Division. Development experience with space projects at both NASA Goddard and JPL, including FUSE, WFC3, GLAST, LISA, and MSL along with numerous architecture studies.

    • Darin Dunham

      LM Fellow, Lockheed Martin: Darin Dunham is a Lockheed Martin Fellow and works as a Spiral Chief Engineer for the C2BMC Missile Defense National Team in Huntsville, Alabama. Currently, he works on target tracking and discrimination algorithms within the Missile Defense System. Previous work includes composite network-level tracking algorithms in various scenarios, including air targets with phased-array radar and multiple input, multiple output radar. Darin served almost 10 years in the Marine Corps, ending at the Marine Corps Systems Command. He has an MS in Electrical Engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School and a BS in Electrical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon.

    • 6.01 Systems Engineering Challenges and Approaches for Remote Sensing Systems

      The need to make a particular measurement from a particular vantage point drives us to build sophisticated remote sensing instruments and launch them on similarly sophisticated spacecraft, aircraft, submersibles, balloons, etc. This session explores the highly coupled nature of the instrument, platform architecture, flight path design, ground system and mission operations, and the systems engineering challenges and solutions employed. Topics include instrument influences on platform architectures and flight path design, platform-to-instrument integration, trade studies, trends and novel solutions.

      • Travis Imken

        Systems Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Travis Imken is the Psyche Launch Phase Lead. He previously served as a Deployment Phase Systems Engineer for the InSight Lander and the Project Systems Engineer for the RainCube mission. Travis has worked on Mars Sample Return, ARRM, and the Lunar Flashlight and NEA Scout deep space CubeSats.

      • Bogdan Oaida

        Group Supervisor, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology: Bogdan Oaida is a Systems Engineer at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He is the Technical Group Supervisor for the Instruments Systems Engineering group. He previously served as the Deputy Project Systems Engineer for the EMIT mission, the Project Systems Engineer for OPALS, and as a Payload Systems Engineer on the Europa Clipper mission, working with the SUDA and MISE instruments.

      • Maria De Soria Santacruz Pich

        Systems Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Maria de Soria-Santacruz Pich received a Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from MIT in 2014. During 2014 she was a postdoctoral scholar at UCLA working on the development of an energetic particle detector for the ELFIN satellite and on the analysis of Van Allen Probes data. She joined JPL in 2015, where she defined space radiation environments and supported radiation analyses and testing for multiple missions. In 2017, she joined the Psyche project, where she stayed through launch in October 2023 as the Payload Lead Systems Engineer. Maria is currently the Flight Systems Engineer and Contract Technical Manager for the SBG-VSWIR mission. Her interests include systems engineering, instrument development, space physics, and climate sciences.

    • 6.02 Instrument and Sensor Architecture, Design, Test, and Accommodation

      This session covers topics related to the physical or functional architecture and design of instruments/sensors. Topics include hardware/software trade studies, fault protection approaches, unique or innovative system interfaces, accommodation of payloads within a system, system-level instrument/sensor testing, instrument/sensor integration, test, and calibration, and approaches to the processes involved in engineering an instrument or sensor.

      • Matthew Horner

        Mechanical Systems Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Matthew Horner received his bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, San Diego in 2006. He Started at JPL in 2007 working as a designer and integration engineer for the Mars Science Laboratory project. Over the past 15 years, he has developed hardware for various flight missions including MSL, SMAP, and LDSD. He is currently the Product Delivery Manager for the Mechanical and Harness Subsystems on the Europa Clipper project and the Mechanical Systems Engineer for the Sample Return Lander Cruise Stage.

      • Keith Rosette

        Deputy Project Manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Mr. Rosette is currently the Deputy Project Manager for the Mars Sample Return Capture, Containment, and Return System at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Prior to this role, he was the Deputy Section Manager for the Flight Systems Engineering, Integration and Test Section and was also the Product Delivery Manager for the Sampling and Caching Subsystem of the Mars2020 Perseverance Rover. He started in aerospace in 1991 and has experience in both industry and JPL including hardware development for human spaceflight and spacecraft development for LEO, GEO and interplanetary missions. He earned a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering in 1991 and an M.S. in Mechanical Engineering in 1994.

    • 6.03 Imaging Spectrometer Systems, Science, and Applications

      This session covers the design, assembly, calibration, and operation of imaging spectrometer instruments and hyperspectral sensors. Technology development and data processing techniques are also included, as well as proposed instruments and lessons learned from all phases.

      • Peter Sullivan

        Electrical Engineer, NASA Jet Propulsion Lab: Peter Sullivan is an electrical engineer specializing in mixed-signal design and infrared instrumentation at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He has previously worked at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and holds a B.S. from Cornell University and a S.M. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has characterized image sensors for applications ranging from Earth science to exoplanet detection.

      • Mohamed Abid

        SRL Payload Chief Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory / NASA: Dr. Abid is the Mars Sample Return Payload Chief Engineer. He was the Mars 2020 deputy Mechanical Chief Engineer, M2020 Cruise, Entry, Descent & Landing (CEDL) MSE, and M2020 Anomaly Response Team lead. Prior to that, Dr. Abid was the JPL Mechatronics technical group manager, the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Chief Engineer, the Flight System SE for the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission, and Project SE on Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM). Dr. Abid received his Ph.D. from the Dept of Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering of the University of Southern California (USC). He is a lecturer at USC and the author of the text book “Spacecraft Sensors”, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd 2005

    • 6.04 Radar, IR, and Electro-Optical Sensor Systems and Signal Processing

      This session focuses on remote sensing devices, systems, and signal processing. Topics of interest include surveillance and imaging radars, infrared search and track systems, IR components and instrumentation, and electro-optic imagers and their application to environmental, defense, astronomical, and meteorological sensing.

      • Thomas Backes

        Research Engineer, Georgia Institute of Technology: Research engineer in the area of radars and tracking. BSEE, MSEE, MS Mathematics, MS Industrial Engineering, and MBA, all from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

      • Donnie Smith

        Radar Engineer, Waymo: Radar Engineer, Waymo. Interests include target tracking, estimation theory, and radar imaging and kinematics. M.S. EE, Georgia Institute of Technology.

      • Robert Magnusson

        Professor, University of Texas at Arlington: Robert Magnusson received the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is Texas Instruments Distinguished University Chair in Nanoelectronics and Professor of Electrical Engineering at UT Arlington. Current theoretical and experimental research addresses periodic micro- and nanostructures, nanolithography, IR optical components, photonics, nanoelectronics, lasers, and optical bio- and chemical sensors. He has published 500 journal and conference papers and holds 40 patents. He is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America (Optica) and SPIE, a Life Fellow of IEEE, and a Charter Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. He is Co-founder and Chief Technical Officer of Resonant Sensors Incorporated, a company that provides next-generation optical sensor systems for pharmaceutical and biotech customers for biomedical diagnostics including Covid-19. He is founder and Chief Executive Officer of Tiwaz Technologies with aim to develop new IR optical component technology.

    • 6.05 Information Fusion

      This session focuses on exploitation of all sources of information, including physical sensor data, context information, and human inputs. Methodologies for effective multi-sensor multi-target tracking and sensor management of disparate sources are of interest, as are algorithms and advances in downstream analysis of track data for situational awareness.

      • Craig Agate

        Chief Scientist, Toyon Research Corporation: Craig Agate is a Chief Scientist and Fusion and Tracking Team Lead at Toyon Research Corporation. He received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from California State University in Northridge, California and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of California in Santa Barbara where his doctoral thesis dealt with state and parameter estimation using density function approximation. In particular, he analyzed the small-sample and large-sample properties of a nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm that minimizes the Kullback-Leibler distance between the probability density function (PDF) of an unknown parameter and a mixture density. His interests lie in tracking targets using passive RF, track identity management algorithms, track-to-track fusion algorithms, and general problems in information fusion.

      • Dan Harris

        Causal AI Architect, Northrop Grumman Corporation: Dan Harris is a Northrop Grumman Staff System Engineer who currently works on independent research and development. He is a 2008 Naval Academy graduate and earned his Master of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Arizona in 2019. Mr. Harris has worked on many practical application techniques and algorithm development projects involving machine learning and artificial intelligence disciplines, and he has produced several original works contributing to the success of many programs and projects. The role he mainly plays in these projects is a causal AI architect, where he leverages invariant, and therefore causal, correlations between inputs and desired outputs to build causal AI systems that consistently perform well after deployment and are robust against many forms and degrees of noise.

    • 6.06 Multisensor Fusion

      Papers that address all aspects of information fusion for the integration of multiple sensors are sought. Of particular interest are the theoretical aspects of some popular questions. When is sensor fusion better than a single sensor? How does one ensure that sensor fusion produces better results? Paper that document algorithms that address one of the many challenges in multisensor/multitarget tracking or multisensor resource management are also sought.

      • William Blair

        Principal Research Engineer, Georgia Tech Research Institute: Principal Research Engineer at Georgia Tech and IEEE Fellow. Originated two benchmark problems for target tracking and radar resource allocation at Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division. Demonstrated modern tracking algorithms can reduce radar time/energy required for surveillance tracking. Research interests: radar signal processing/control, resource allocation for multifunction radars, multisensor integration/data fusion. Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from University of Virginia.

      • Laura Bateman

        System Engineer, Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory: Laura Ritter Bateman received her B.A. degree in Mathematics from McDaniel College in 1997 and an M.S. in Mathematics from the University of Massachusetts - Amherst in 2000. From 2000 to 2006, she worked for Raytheon as a software engineer developing tracking code for the Patriot radar and later as a system engineer on the Missile Defense National Team B (MDNTB) developing tracking algorithms for the Missile Defense Agency's (MDA) Command and Control Battle Management and Communications (C2BMC) system. Mrs. Bateman currently works as a Chief Engineer for Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Her efforts are focused in the areas of non-kinetics, cognitive communication, tracking, battle management, and sensor resource management.

    • 6.07 Applications of Target Tracking

      Tracking of targets, both cooperative and uncooperative, moving under water, on water, on land, in air or in space, with sonar, radar or electro-optical sensors. Fusion of data from multiple sensors. Algorithms for handling target maneuvers and data association. Estimation of sensor properties (biases, noise variances). Includes traditional tracking algorithms and AI/ML approaches.

      • John Glass

        Systems Engineer, RTX: Dr. Glass is a systems engineer with RTX in Woburn, Massachusetts. In 2009 he graduated from the University of Tennessee with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, and in 2010 at Georgia Tech with a Master of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering. In May 2015, Dr. Glass completed the Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech. His dissertation focused on the monopulse processing and tracking of targets. From 2011-2017, Dr. Glass was a member of the Editorial Board for the Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine as Associate Editor for Student Research, recruiting and handling student highlight articles. His research interests include target tracking, sensor resource allocation, detection and estimation applied to radar, and the general field of digital signal processing.

      • John Grimes

        Scientist, BAE Systems, Inc: John Grimes currently works at BAE Systems Fast Labs in Burlington, MA. He is the direct of space systems research within FAST labs. He previously was the Director of the distributed fusion and resource management and works on multi-domain command and control, data fusion, and autonomy programs. He previously worked at MIT Lincoln Laboratory from 2007-2017 on a wide variety of problems related to space systems and ISR. John recieved a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University (2007) in extragalactic astrophysics. His research was focused on space satellite operations, data analytics, and computational modeling. His particular research areas of expertise are in automated battle management, adversary behavior modeling, predictive tracking, data fusion, and systems analysis. Previously he has also worked at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and the University of Chicago.

    • 6.08 Fusion Integration of Sensor Harvesting

      Methods for situation awareness/assessment, threat/impact analysis, sensor/processing refinement, user/man-machine interfaces, and mission awareness/responsiveness. Techniques for system design leveraging information fusion for Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Cyber Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C5ISR) over multi-domain sensor data and intelligence collections. Applications focusing on space, air, and architecture developments for efficient and effective distributed net-centric operations, edge computing, and complex networks. Approaches for software/hardware dynamic data-driven applications systems (DDDAS) improvements, context-enhanced results, and avionics protocols for big data scenarios. Use of information fusion to optimize and coordinate machine analytics with users for human-machine teaming.

      • Erik Blasch

        IEEE Aerospace & Electronic Systems Society, Air Force Research Laboratory: ERIK BLASCH is a program officer at the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR). He has held various positions at the Air Force Research Laboratory: Principle Scientist fielding multi-int fusion systems, Exchange Scientist to Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC), and Information Fusion Evaluation Tech Lead supporting design evaluations. Dr. Blasch has been an Adjunct Electrical Engineering Professor at Wright State University teaching signal processing courses and reserve colonel. He has focused on information fusion, target tracking, pattern recognition, and avionics compiling 11 books,160 journal and 500+ scientific papers and 43 patents, and is an associate editor of three academic journals. He is an Fellow of AIAA, IEEE, MSS, and SPIE.

      • Peter Zulch

        Engineer, Air Force Research Laboratory: Engineer, Air Force Research Laboratory. 30 years with AFRL. Interests in multidimensional adaptive signal processing with applications to radar and ELINT. Current interests include multi-modal upstream data fusion and collaborative autonomy of distributed, heterogeneous, sensing systems. Senior member of the IEEE. Graduate degrees from Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY.

    This track presents avionics and electronics implemented for space applications. All spacecraft electrical systems and subsystems are topical. Designs in the notional, active development, or implemented phase are covered. Sessions cover high performance computing, peripheral electronics, guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) technologies, and power electronics as implemented in a resilient manner and adapted for the extreme space environment for all sizes of spacecraft.

    • John Dickinson

      Manager, Research & Development, Flight Edge Compute Systems, Sandia National Laboratories: Experience in spacecraft & payload systems engineering and avionics design & test on Kepler, WISE, JUNO, IBEX, RBSP, MMS, SPP, Solar Orbiter, CYGNSS, and multiple government programs. BSEE, Johns Hopkins University; MSEE, Georgia Institute of Technology.

    • Patrick Phelan

      Manager - R&D, Southwest Research Institute: Patrick T. Phelan is a Manager at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio, TX, USA in the Space Systems Division. He received a B.S. in Computer Engineering in 2005 and a M.S. in Electrical Engineering in 2006, both from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He has been with SwRI for more than seventeen years serving in a variety of roles with growing responsibility on space programs. Most recently, he is serving as a project manager and systems engineer for several DoD technology demonstration programs.

    • 7.01 High Performance Computing and On-Board Data Processing for Space Applications

      Explore innovations and new developments in spacecraft on-board and embedded computing architectures. Example hardware topics: processors, data handling and companion processing ASICs and FPGAs, multicore processing architectures, application of soft-core embedded FPGA processors, emerging GPU technologies for space-based applications, on-orbit reconfiguration, and new or applied standards for embedded space electronics applications. Example software topics: machine learning techniques, embedded cluster computing, on-board big data analytics, power-aware optimal reconfiguration algorithms, reconfigurable software-implemented hardware fault tolerance algorithms and designs, evolutionary platforms, and autonomous computing designs. Papers should address, as applicable: processing performance, size-weight-power (SWaP) comparisons of different components and architectures, standardized form factors, protocols and interfaces, radiation hardness by design, process, or technology, mitigation of other spacecraft environmental factors, software support, and integration and test of elements. Descriptions and performance of actual development, test, flight, or mission usage are highly sought.

      • Jamal Haque

        Chief Satellite Architect, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company: Dr. Haque is Chief Satellite Architect/OA for Lockheed Space Communications. Dr. Haque's experiences and interests are wireless systems, OFDM-based systems in high mobile platforms, channel estimation, cognitive software defined radio, signal processing, channel coding, high-speed connectivity and robust space processing systems and architectures. He has also worked at advance development groups at AT&T, Rockwell, Lucent (Bell Labs) technology and Honeywell on voice band modem, xDSL modem, Sirius satellite radio, satellite and space systems. He has 14 publications and has been awarded 33 US patents.

      • Robert Merl

        Electrical Engineer, Los Alamos National Laboratory: Robert Merl received a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1992 and an M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago in 1996. He has been with Los Alamos National Laboratory for 19 years and was previously with Argonne National Laboratory. Rob is the project engineer for the Processing and Communication team in the Intelligence and Space Research Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is also the principal design engineer for several space flight modules currently under development at the laboratory. Rob has 26 years of experience in circuit design. Rob is an instrument rated pilot and a commercial drone pilot.

    • 7.02 Peripheral Electronics, Data Handling, and Interconnects for Space Applications

      This session explores novel concepts for hardware and software technologies that support but are peripheral to the main computing core. Example topics include: novel instrument or payload hardware and software technologies; network connections architectures; high speed interconnects; mixed signal and systems-on-a-chip technologies; onboard signal, data, and command processing; telecommand reception, decoding, and distribution; payload data pre-processing; dedicated accelerators for data processing; transmission and storage (e.g. compression, encoding, parallel processing for payloads (GIPs, GFLOPs), etc.); fault-tolerance mechanisms; autonomous operations, reconfigurable approaches, and failsafe strategies; emerging and novel designs and tests for high performance embedded computing platforms; temporal and spatial reuse of systems' resources; sensor, detector, and imager readout circuits; high resolution/ high speed ADCs and DACs; resource efficient (mass/ volume ) miniaturized multi-channel/ parallel systems; circuit designs for analog and digital processing functions; and designs for integrated communications systems applications on a chip.

      • Patrick Phelan

        Manager - R&D, Southwest Research Institute: Patrick T. Phelan is a Manager at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio, TX, USA in the Space Systems Division. He received a B.S. in Computer Engineering in 2005 and a M.S. in Electrical Engineering in 2006, both from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He has been with SwRI for more than seventeen years serving in a variety of roles with growing responsibility on space programs. Most recently, he is serving as a project manager and systems engineer for several DoD technology demonstration programs.

      • Mark Post

        Senior Lecturer, University of York: Mark A. Post received his B.A.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Toronto in 2004 and his M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in space engineering from York University by 2014. He is currently working at the University of York in North England. His research includes mechatronic and embedded design of reliable and efficient robotic space systems and intelligent algorithms for autonomous control.

      • Michael Epperly

        Senior Program Manager, Southwest Research Institute: Senior Program Manager, Space Systems Department, Southwest Research Institute. Manager, Memory Subsystems product line and Program Manager for the Central Instrument Data Processor (CIDP) for the Magnetosphere Multi-Scale Mission (MMS). Formerly, Program Manager for the Mixed-Mode Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (MMASIC) for the Mar Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL-RAD). BSEE, University of Texas; MSEE, MSCS, and MS in Systems Engineering/Program Management, Johns-Hopkins University.

    • 7.03 Assembly, Integration, and Test for Electrical Space Systems

      This session explores all aspects of assembly, integration, and test of electrical space systems. This includes assembly, integration, and test efforts at the board-level for RF, analog, or digital card assemblies; box-level for command, telemetry, data handling, data processing, control, power, or mixed-purpose avionics; subsystem-level for instruments/payloads; or system-level for entire spacecraft electrical subsystems. Papers can address innovative uses of test software, test scripts, mission simulation, human-computer interface, electrical support ground equipment, and harnessing to accomplish integration and test. Papers also address unique system engineering and configuration control approaches to manage test, and transition from system test to launch and mission operations.

      • Eric Bradley

        Computer Engineer, Naval Research Lab: Eric Bradley works as a program manager for the Naval Center for Space Technology (NCST) at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Eric has experience in the development of experimental space systems in technology areas ranging from propulsion to communications to remote sensing. He has led teams through all phases of the space system development lifecycle including requirements definition, design, implementation, test, launch, and on-orbit operations. Eric’s technical focus area is on all aspects of electrical system integration and testing from avionics to software to entire spacecraft.

      • Eric Rossland

        Electronics Engineer, Naval Research Laboratory: Eric Rossland is an employee at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) with over 20 years experience in spacecraft systems engineering. Eric works in the spacecraft systems electrical integration and test section on efforts from robotics, to space sensors, to entire spacecraft, and mission operations. Eric’s most recent technical focus area is space robotics, specifically robotic arm system design, integration, and test. On multiple flight programs, Eric managed teams through the entirety of the project from requirements development, design, hardware and software implementation, integration and test, verification/validation, and spacecraft launch and on-orbit operations. As a subject matter expert in the field of spacecraft electrical and robotic systems integration and test, Eric has been consulted to support internal and external program design reviews.

    • 7.04 Power Electronics for Aerospace Applications

      This session explores advanced power electronics designs and systems for space and avionics applications. Example topics include: power devices; wide bandgap power semiconductors; power electronics; electro-magnetic devices; photo-voltaic modules; energy storage and battery management systems and power systems. Papers discuss technical aspects of power electronics including extreme thermal and power requirements, radiation hardening, efficiency and power management, tolerance to aerospace environments, and reliability.

      • Christopher Iannello

        NASA Technical Fellow for Electrical Power, NASA - NESC : Dr. Iannello has over 20 years of experience in power systems in Industry, Academia, and with NASA. He received his BSEE, MSEE, and PhD EE. at the University of Central Florida in ’94, ’99, and ’01 respectively all with a Power Electronics emphasis. . http://www.nasa.gov/offices/nesc/academy/Chris_Iannello_bio.html

      • Thomas Cook

        Senior Research Engineer, Southwest Research Institute: Thomas Cook received a B.S. in Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh in 2017 and PhD in 2023. Dr. Cook is currently a senior research engineer at Southwest Research Institute in the Space Avionics Section.

    • 7.05 Electronics for Extreme Environments

      This session explores innovations in electronics technologies and packaging that help enable operation of electronics in extreme environments, including space. Technologies resilient to extremes in temperature, radiation, and launch vehicle environments are relevant. Example topics include: materials and techniques for assembling and testing microelectronics; component packaging, attachment, and connectors; thermal/mechanical/electrical/radiation performance comparisons; reliability and failure analyses; adaptation of manufacturing methods for space applications; and integration of diverse modules such as MEMS, power electronics, sensors, optics, RF and microprocessors.

      • Mohammad Mojarradi

        Manger, Componnent Engineering and Assurance, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Manager, Component Engineering and Assurance, JPL. IC design specialist, expert in mixed-signal/mixed-voltage circuits, sensors, micro-machined electromechanical interface systems for extreme environment of space. Twenty years experience. Twenty-seven patents, forty publications.

    • 7.06 Fault Tolerance, Autonomy, and Evolvability in Spacecraft and Instrument Avionics

      This session explores adaptation, including Fault Tolerance, Autonomy, and Evolvability, in space electronics. Adaptation reflects the capability of a system to maintain or improve its performance in the presence of internal or external changes, such as faults and degradations, uncertainties and variations during fabrication, modifications in the operational environment, or incidental interference. This session addresses all aspects of adaptivity for spacecraft and instrument avionics with the scope of papers encompassing theoretical considerations, design solutions, and actual techniques applied to space flight operations.

      • Tom Hoffman

        Project Manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Project Manager of the Near Earth Objects (NEOs) Surveyor Project at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a mission to identify and characterize potentially hazardous NEOs. Formerly Project Manager of the InSight Mars Lander project. Formerly Deputy Project Manager of the GRAIL project which gravity mapped the moon. Has worked on several successful JPL flight and technology programs including Voyager, Cassini, STARDUST, and Mars Exploration Rovers. Specialties include Project Management, Avionics System Engineering, Computer Architecture, and Fault Protection.

      • Didier Keymeulen

        Principal, Member Technical Staff, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Principal, Member technical staff, JPL. Interests in design and implementation of adaptive and intelligent embedded flight systems

    • 7.07 Guidance, Navigation, and Control Technologies for Space Applications

      This session explores sensor, actuator, algorithm and processing innovations related to the guidance, navigation, and control of space vehicles. This session welcomes manuscripts that discuss technologies applicable to satellites, probes, landers, launchers, and other space-related missions.

      • Leena Singh

        Senior Staff, MIT Lincoln Laboratory: Leena Singh is a Guidance, Navigation and Control Systems engineer with experience in the autonomous GN&C of space, missile, and planetary reentry & landing bodies. She presently holds a Senior Technical Staff position in Control and Autonomous Systems Engineering at MIT Lincoln Laboratory. She has previously worked at Draper Laboratory holding various positions providing GN&C expertise in the area of single spacecraft operations, formation control of spacecraft clusters, and in the rendezvous and proximity operations of spacecraft approaching for docking. Leena Singh has been a member of the IEEE and the AIAA for over 20 years and is a Fellow of the AIAA.

      • Matthew Lashley

        Senior Research Engineer, GTRI: Dr. Matthew Lashley is a Senior Research Engineer in the Air & Missile Defense Division (AMDD) of the Sensors and Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory (SEAL) at Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI). He received his bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees from Auburn University in 2004, 2006, & 2009. His research background is in the area of vector tracking algorithms for GPS receivers and the deep integration of GPS and inertial measurement units. He joined GTRI in 2015 and has since worked in the areas of radar interferometry, target tracking, and GPS-denied navigation.

      • John Enright

        Professor, Toronto Metropolitan University: John Enright is a Professor in Department of Aerospace Engineering at Toronto Metropolitan University (formerly Ryerson University). His primary research interests concern the development of attitude sensors for spacecraft, optical navigation, and mobile robotics.

    • 7.08 Emerging Technologies for Space Applications

      This session explores a wide range of advanced, novel, and cutting edge device technologies for space applications. Example topics include: advanced MEMS devices; 3D circuit printing; innovative embedded electronics applications (including multi-functional components); as well as the leveraging of advanced commercial electronics for space applications. This session also serves as a catch-all for unique advanced technology topics that do not fit cleanly into other sessions or are inherently multi-disciplinary in nature.

      • William Jackson

        Senior Scientist, L3Harris Technologies: Senior Scientist, L3Harris Technologies. Spacecraft systems engineer for various small satellite programs. Expertise in systems engineering, mission analysis and operations, mathematical modeling and optimization, and spacecraft design. Senior member of IEEE, and Associate Fellow of AIAA.

      • Michael Mclelland

        Vice President, Space Systems Division, Southwest Research Institute: Michael McLelland leads Southwest Research Institute’s Space Systems Division, which develops next-generation space missions, systems and enabling technologies to support fundamental space science, national security and commercial applications. Mr. McLelland has over 32 years engineering and management expertise in spacecraft constellations, small satellites, spacecraft avionics, power systems, science payloads and autonomous high-altitude airships. He has played key roles in the development of over 28 spaceflight systems.

    • 7.09 COTS Utilization for Reliable Space Applications

      This session explores the use of commercial, off-the-shelf electronics and technologies in a space environment. Using commercial electronics not intended for an application in a space environment is becoming increasingly common. Topics of interest include: adaptations of COTS electronics for fault tolerance and environmental resilience; flight proven COTS electronics; novel implementations of electrical functions using COTS components; and results of COTS component use. Papers address theoretical considerations, design solutions, and actual techniques applied to space flight operations.

      • Douglas Carssow

        Electronics Engineer, Naval Research Laboratory: Dr. Douglas Carssow is the Naval Center for Space Technology Digital Flight Systems section head. He earned his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Boston University in 2010. He is a former Naval Research Laboratory Karle’s Fellow and has 18 years of space hardware experience. He is currently working on algorithms for on-orbit maritime situational awareness.

    • 7.10 Designing Spacecraft Hardware for Electromagnetic Compatibility, Signal Integrity, and Power Integrity in Space Applications

      This session explores the advanced and innovative techniques recently developed that ensure spacecraft hardware are designed and hardened for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) with emphasis on signal integrity and power integrity (SI/PI) of the unit electronics. Topics of interest include: risks posed by Electromagnetic Interference (EMI), SI/PI, DC magnetic cleanliness and Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) present in spacecraft instruments, International Space Station instruments, spacecraft & space launch vehicle systems, robotics, and crewed vehicles. Papers address a wide range of topics and present innovative modeling and hardware solutions to EMC on the part, board, box, system, multi-system, planetary, and interplanetary levels. The harshness of the space environments necessitates a broader view of EMC issues than traditional terrestrial projects, often leading to creative methods and solutions that can benefit our society’s efforts elsewhere on Earth.

      • Jeffrey Boye

        Engineer, JHUAPL: Jeff is a hardware design engineer at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in Laurel MD. He currently has hardware that is orbiting the sun on the Parker Solar Probe mission and is the lead engineer of the CORESAT Single Board Computer, a multi-mission radhard compute platform.

      • Pablo Narvaez

        Principal Engineer/Section Manager, NASA Jet Propulsion Lab: Pablo Narvaez has worked at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory since 1985 and is currently a Section Manager and a Principal Engineer and is the subject matter expert for JPL in flight spacecraft Electromagnetic Compatibility and Magnetic environments (EMC/Mag). He led the EMC/Mag efforts for: Galileo (from 1985, up to launch in 1989; post-Challenger re-design for VEEGA mission), Ulysses, instruments flown on the Shuttle (SRTM, SIR-C, Lambda Point Experiment, Drop Physics Module), Cassini, Mars Exploration Rovers, CloudSat, Deep Impact, DAWN, OCO-2, Aquarius/SAC-D, Juno and on the just recently launched Grace Follow-On. He is currently overseeing the EMC/Mag efforts for: Europa Clipper, Mars 2020, SWOT, and non-NASA projects. He is the EMC group supervisor and Section Chief Engineer for Reliability Engineering and Mission Environmental Assurance.

    • Greg Chavers

      Strategic Architect and Integration Manager, NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center: Dr. Greg Chavers is the strategic architect and integration manager for science and technology at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Previous roles include Director of the Mars Campaign Office at NASA HQ, Director of the Technical Integration Office at NASA HQ, assistant deputy associate administrator for Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) in NASA’s Exploration Systems Development Mission Directorate and deputy program manager of NASA’s Human Landing System (HLS) Program, and prior to HLS program formulation, he was a lead developer of HLS requirements and government reference architecture. As HLS deputy program manager, Greg was jointly responsible for leading the development of an integrated human lunar landing system for the Artemis program. Dr. Chavers earned his bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering from Auburn University, and his master’s and doctoral degrees in physics from the University of Alabama, Huntsville.

    • Lisa May

      NextGen Strategy & BD Sr Manager, Lockheed Martin Space: Lisa May is an accomplished senior executive and systems engineer with more than 35 years of success across aerospace and technology industries. She is currently Lockheed Martin’s Deep Space Exploration Strategy & BD Lead for Commercial Civil Space. Her portfolio includes robotic science solutions, including deep space planetary missions. Previously, she was the the Commercial Civil Space Chief Technologist. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, Ms. May founded Murphian Consulting, where she consulted to technology entrepreneurs in such diverse fields as nuclear, forensics, space, and transportation technology. Before that she was NASA's Lead Program Executive for the Mars Exploration Program and PE for MAVEN, Mars Technology, and Mars Sample Return. Also, former Chair of the International Mars Exploration Working Group. Lisa is an IEEE senior member, an AIAA Associate Fellow, an AAS Fellow, and an INCOSE Expert Systems Engineering Professional. Lisa has an ME in Mechanical Engineering and BA in Speech Communications, from the University of Virginia.

    • 8.01 Human Exploration Beyond Low Earth Orbit

      This session seeks papers addressing the broader aspects of human and scientific exploration including planning, development, system concepts, and execution of missions beyond low Earth orbit toward the lunar surface and on to Mars. Sample topics include systems architecture studies of human missions to cislunar space, the Moon and Mars, design reference mission analyses, strategic concepts, broader trade study and systems engineering analyses for any aspect of human and scientific space exploration systems beyond low-Earth orbit, and post-mission analyses and lessons learned from executed missions. Lunar landers, surface systems and sustainable concepts for lunar exploration extensibility toward Mars exploration missions are in focus.

      • Kevin Post

        Mission Design Engineer, Booz Allen Hamilton: With a Master of Science in Aerospace, Kevin has worked in the aerospace field for 35 years. After moving to Houston, he worked with the International Space Station performing analyses for the Vehicle Integrated Performance and Resources (VIPeR) team, as well as becoming deeply involved in the thermal and power analyses which were part of the space stations’ solar array installation and deployment operations. Working with Booz Allen Hamilton as part of the NASA Exploration Mission Planning Office, Kevin supports the mission design for Artemis trajectory design and flight profile development.

      • Chel Stromgren

        COO, Binera, Inc.: Chel Stromgren is the Lead of the Campaign Analysis Team within NASA’s Strategy and Architecture Office. He leads a team that evaluates the value and affordability of strategic exploration architectures. He has over 20 years of experience working on human exploration architectures for NASA, including space logistics, risk, affordability, and measures of effectiveness.

    • 8.02 Human Exploration Systems Technology Development

      This session seeks papers dealing with technology development for human exploration of space. This can include development efforts with technology readiness levels anywhere from laboratory to full-scale flight demos. It can also include assessments of technology needs of programs, program elements, or individual mission concepts.

      • Matthew Simon

        Capabilities Integration Lead, NASA Langley Research Center: Dr. Matthew Simon is the Capabilities Integration Lead supporting the Exploration Systems Development Mission Directorate within NASA. In this role, he leads the team responsible for identifying and characterizing capability and technology gaps to achieve future human exploration missions and integrating plans to close these gaps with technology development opportunities across NASA. Dr. Simon also has extensive experience in habitat and human system design, human mission architecture analysis, portfolio development, and technology assessment. He received his Ph. D. in Aerospace Engineering from Georgia Tech in May 2016 with his thesis on automated spacecraft interior layout evaluation and design.

      • Erica Rodgers

        Senior Analyst, NASA - Headquarters: Dr. Erica Rodgers is a senior analyst within NASA’s Office of Technology, Policy, and Strategy. Rodgers leads studies of Agency and National importance to provide data- and evidence-driven technology, policy, and strategy advice to NASA leadership. Rodgers leads the Science and Technology Partnership Forum and establishes government-wide collaboration frameworks to influence portfolios across U.S. government space agencies. Rodgers previously served as an aerospace engineer at NASA’s Langley Research Center, where she performed systems analysis of Mars exploration architectures. Prior to joining NASA, Rodgers performed research of solar X-rays and their impact on Earth’s upper atmosphere and of dust grain environments surrounding forming stars and developed and launched science instrumentation. While performing research, Rodgers taught astronomy and astrophysics at several colleges and universities and worked in the aerospace industry in systems engineering and satellite operations. Rodgers received her PhD in space physics from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and her BS and MS in aerospace engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

    • 8.03 Advanced Launch Vehicle Systems and Technologies

      This session seeks papers covering on-going development and future advances in space transportation from Earth to orbit and distant destinations. Topics including transportation architectures, launch vehicles, infrastructure, transportation business and enabling technologies are of interest.

      • Melissa Sampson

        Strategy & External Engagement Lead, Lockheed Martin: Dr. Melissa Sampson is the Strategy & External Engagements Senior Manager for Lockheed Martin National Security Space. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, Dr. Sampson served in a variety of increasingly responsible roles at Ball Aerospace and United Launch Alliance. Her experience spans cislunar domain, business development, advanced programs, engineering, contracts, and government affairs. Dr. Sampson earned her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Colorado and her B.S. in Chemistry from the College of William and Mary. She is an AIAA Associate Fellow and an International Coaching Federation (ICF) certified coach.

      • Randy Williams

        Systems Director, The Aerospace Corporation: Randy Williams earned an M.S. and a B.S in Aero-Sciences and Mechanical Engineering, respectively, from the University of California at San Diego (UCSD). He's held several positions at The Aerospace Corporation after initial hire in 1987 in the Aerophysics Laboratory. He worked in the Propulsion Department on satellite propulsion systems for Milstar, DMSP, and STP programs. He transferred to the Medium Launch Vehicle Program Office. He led several multi-disciplinary teams tasked with resolving significant technical issues the Atlas II/III/V and Delta II launch vehicles. He began work on the Space Shuttle Return-to-Flight mission, characterizing the External Tank foam debris risk to the Space Shuttle Program. In 2007, he provided system engineering leadership and lead development of induced flight environments for NASA’s successful Ares I-X test flight project, in addition to supporting other Constellation projects, for which he received several NASA and corporate awards. He currently serves as a Systems Director in Civil and Commercial Launch Projects Subdivision of the Launch Systems Division, where he serves as the primary focal point for all civil launch-related activities within Launch Program Operations.

    • 8.04 Commercial Services for Lunar and Mars Exploration

      This session seeks papers related to commercial services, such as Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS), Human Landing Systems (HLS), and Deep Space Logistics (DSL), etc for the exploration of Moon and Mars. This includes opportunities and challenges for mission planners and project / program management within NASA as well as opportunities and challenges for the commercial providers. Lessons learned on past and near-term missions are valuable to evolving the commercial services approach and are of high interest. Perspectives on business cases for commercial services is of interest.

      • Paul Niles

        Planetary Scientist, NASA Johnson Space Center: Dr. Paul B. Niles is a planetary geologist and analytical geochemist within the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division at the Johnson Space Center. He researches the geologic conditions of past aqueous environments on Earth, Mars and meteorite parent bodies using high resolution chemical and stable isotopic measurements of secondary minerals. He participated as a science team member on the Phoenix Mars Lander (2007-08) and the Mars Science Laboratory (2011-15) missions. Dr. Niles also has also worked as a project scientist for the Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) project office at NASA Johnson Space Center since 2019. He was the lead project scientist for the Astrobotic Peregrine 1 mission that launched in early 2024. Finally, Dr. Niles has helped lead several efforts to define science objectives for Human Exploration of Mars including the Scientific Objectives for the Human Exploration of Mars Science Analysis Group (2015) and the Science Objectives for Human Exploration of Mars Workshop (2022).

      • Steve Matousek

        Mars advanced studies manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Steve Matousek is currently the Mars Exploration Program advanced studies manager. Recent leadership roles include JPL Advanced Concept Methods and Tools Manager (Architecture Team, aka A-Team), the creation of new advanced concept concurrent teams including the JPL A-Team and Team Xc (CubeSat/SmallSat). He led numerous advanced study teams across the areas of Earth Science, Astrophysics, Planetary Science, and technology infusion. Before his current assignments, Steve was the Juno (current mission orbiting Jupiter) proposal manager and then mission manager responsible for the development of the mission and operations. He has led over 20 major mission proposals over 2 decades. He was a trajectory engineer on the Voyager 2 Uranus and Neptune encounters. He started his aerospace career as an undergraduate command controller of the Solar Mesospheric Explorer at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics in Boulder, Colorado. He is an Associate Fellow of the AIAA, and teaches a graduate class at USC in space systems for remote sensing. His research interests include novel smallsat and nanosat applications for solar system exploration, and advanced methods of sustained innovation and creativity.

    • 8.05 Human Factors & Performance

      This session seeks papers on human performance, integration, and operations within complex spacecraft systems. Suggested human factors topics may include cockpit and flight deck displays and controls, autonomous crew performance, handling qualities and flight performance, human-robotic interaction and performance, team performance and dynamics, training, countermeasures technologies/systems, and behavioral health and performance during short- and long-duration spaceflight. Papers including operations to experimental and modeling approaches, both in the laboratory and in spaceflight analog locations are of interest.

      • Jessica Marquez

        Human System Engineer, NASA Ames Research Center: Jessica J. Marquez, Ph.D. works at NASA Ames Research Center, within the Human Systems Integration Division. Her work has focused on space mission operations, space human factors engineering, and human-computer interaction. She received her Ph.D. in Human-Systems Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), her S.M. in Aeronautics and Astronautics also from MIT, and her B.S.E. In Mechanical Engineering from Princeton University.

      • Kevin Duda

        Senior Program Manager, Space Systems, The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc.: Kevin Duda is a Senior Program Manager and Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff in the Space Systems Program Office at The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. He holds a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, and a M.S. and Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from MIT.

    • 8.06 Space Human Physiology and Countermeasures

      This session focuses on the physiological aspects of humans in space and current or future countermeasures and technologies to maximize human health and performance in the space environment. Suggested topics include (but are not limited to) bone loss, muscle atrophy, psychological effects, sensory-motor deconditioning, extravehicular activity, cardiovascular adaptation, Spaceflight Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome (SANS), decompression sickness, radiation, exercise, injury biomechanics, or artificial gravity. Physiological and psychological aspects of missions at Space Analogue sites are also of interest. Both experimental and modeling approaches are welcome.

      • Ana Diaz Artiles

        Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University: Dr. Ana Diaz Artiles is an Assistant Professor at Texas A&M University. Her interests focus on human spaceflight and space system engineering, particularly on aerospace biomedical engineering, extravehicular activity, and human performance in altered gravity environments. She received her Ph.D from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2015, where she studied artificial gravity combined with exercise as a countermeasure to spaceflight-related physiological deconditioning. Prior to MIT, Ana worked for five years in Kourou (French Guiana) as a member of the Ariane 5 Launch team. In particular, she worked as a specialist in operations concerning the Ariane 5 upper stage (both cryogenic and storable) and ground systems. Dr. Diaz Artiles has a background in aeronautical engineering from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain), and SUPAERO in Toulouse (France). She is a 2011 Fulbright fellow, and a 2014 Amelia Earhart Fellowship recipient.

      • Andrew Abercromby

        Lead - Human Physiology, Performance, Protection and Operations (H-3PO) Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center: Andrew Abercromby received an M.Eng. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Edinburgh in 2002 during which he worked in the Flight Mechanics Laboratory at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) on a spacecraft attitude determination technology for X-38. He earned a Ph.D. in Motor Control from the University of Houston while working in the JSC Neurosciences Laboratory, and is now lead of NASA's Human Physiology, Performance, Protection and Operations (H-3PO) Laboratory. Andrew's research studies involve human-centered development and assessment of prototype spacesuits, vehicles, communications architectures, and operations concepts in environments including parabolic aircraft, virtual reality, volcanic lava flows, underwater habitats, Arctic impact craters, and ice-covered Antarctic lakes. Other ongoing research efforts include the mathematical modeling and empirical validation of prebreathe protocols for the mitigation of decompression sickness risk during spaceflight.

      • Torin Clark

        Associate Professor, University of Colorado-Boulder: Torin Clark, PhD is an Assistant Professor at the University of Colorado-Boulder in the Smead Aerospace Engineering Sciences department and Biomedical Engineering program. He is a principal investigator in the Bioastronautics Laboratory and a faculty affiliate of BioServe Space Technologies. Prior to joining CU-Boulder in 2015, he was a National Space Biomedical Research Institute post-doctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. He completed his Masters and PhD in the Man-Vehicle Laboratory (now the Human Systems Laboratory) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his BS in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Colorado. His research is focused on the challenges that human operators face in complex aerospace environments. Specifically, he focuses on astronaut biomedical issues, space human factors, human sensorimotor/vestibular function and adaptation, interaction of human-autonomous and human-robotic systems, trust in autonomous systems, mathematical models of spatial orientation perception, and human-in-the-loop experiments.

    • 8.07 Mechanical Systems, Design and Technologies

      This session seeks papers on spacecraft configurations, structures, mechanical and thermal systems, devices, and technologies for space flight systems and in situ exploration. Papers addressing mechanical systems design, ground testing, and flight validation are also encouraged.

      • Alexander Eremenko

        Mechanical Systems Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Alexander Eremenko. I received Masters degree in Aerospace Engineering from the Moscow Aviation Institute, Moscow, USSR (Russia) in 1984. I previously worked for Lavochkin Science & Production Association, Moscow, Russia for 11 years developing a variety of the planetary and astrophysical missions. For the last 16 years I've been working at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory developing a variety of deep space missions/programs including Ice&Fire, Solar Probe, Europa, Pluto, Mars Exploration Rover, Mars Science Laboratory, Aquarius, SMAP, Europa Clipper. I am currently Mars Sample Retrieval Lander pre-Project Flight System Chief Engineer.

      • Peter Rossoni

        Deputy Project Manager, Laser-Enhanced Mission & Navigational Services, NASA/GSFC: Facilitates implementation of laser communications at NASA for high-bandwidth space flight missions. Previously led Mechanical and Systems Engineering development teams for LiDaR, Heliophysics and astronomical missions.

      • Brian McCarthy

        Director, The Aerospace Corporation: As Director of the Structural Mechanics Integration Office in the Engineering and Technology Group of The Aerospace Corporation, Dr. McCarthy is responsible for delivering interdisciplinary solutions to structural mechanics related issues across the breadth of the aerospace industry. In this role, Dr. McCarthy also co-chairs the Aerospace Testing Seminar, and acts as editor for the technical reports that form the basis for SSC-S-016, the environmental test standard for launch, upper-stage, and space vehicles. Prior to becoming a Director, Dr. McCarthy ushered a critical payload technology development effort through several key milestones as a Senior Project Leader. He also fulfilled roles of increasing responsibility as an electronics packaging structural analyst. He holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Northeastern University and a MS and PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

    • 8.08 Spacecraft Propulsion and Power Systems

      This session seeks papers on the development and infusion of in-space propulsion and power generation, storage, and management technologies for future NASA deep space science missions and Earth orbiting applications. The session’s primary focus is on in-space applications and is not intended for human spaceflight topics or launch vehicles.

      • Erica Deionno

        Principal Director, The Aerospace Corporation: Erica DeIonno received a Ph.D. in Chemistry from UCLA. She is currently a Systems Director in the Innovation Office at The Aerospace Corporation. Prior to her current position, her research included molecular and polymer-based electronic devices, radiation testing and modeling of memristor-based memory devices (RRAM), and solar cell degradation modeling. She has participated in a number of failure analysis studies, including testing of MEMS spatial light modulators and CCD arrays.

      • Richard Hofer

        Supervisor, Electric Propulsion, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Richard R. Hofer is a Principal Engineer and the Supervisor of the Electric Propulsion Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He received the B.S.E. degree in mechanical engineering and the B.S.E., M.S.E, and Ph.D. degrees in aerospace engineering from the University of Michigan in 1998, 1998, 2000, and 2004, respectively. Since joining JPL in 2005, his work has focused on the development and qualification of Hall thrusters for deep space missions. In recognition of these efforts, he received the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal, the JPL Lew Allen Award for Excellence, and the AIAA Electric Propulsion Outstanding Technical Achievement Award. Dr. Hofer is a Fellow of the AIAA, the former Chair of the AIAA Electric Propulsion Technical Committee, and on the Board of Directors of the Electric Rocket Propulsion Society. He has been awarded 9 patents and authored over 180 technical publications in electric propulsion.

    • 8.09 Nuclear Space Power Generation

      The Nuclear Space Power Generation session invites papers on all things nuclear and related to space power: concepts for dynamic power systems and static generators at all scales, conversion technologies, fuel processing, reactors for manned and unmanned space missions, lessons learned and best practices, plans for future devices, models and simulations, test results, government policies, nuclear launch safety, infrastructure, and technologies on any scale that address the future success of space missions.

      • Christofer Whiting

        Principal Research Scientist, University of Dayton: Christofer E. Whiting received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Minnesota. For the past 12 years, he has worked as a Principal Research Scientist and Team Leader at the University of Dayton Research Institute where he supports the U.S. Department of Energy’s Space and Defense Power Systems program, NASA’s Radioisotope Power System Program Office, and Zeno Power Systems. Chris’s research specializes in the chemistry and material properties of the fuel used in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG), including plutonium-238 and strontium-90. He also specializes in material characterization and testing of RTGs components and systems through gas phase chemistry, material interactions, and analysis of RTG lifetime performance. Chris is also currently supporting the development of the Next Generation Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator, a next-generation power system for use in various space exploration missions.

      • Concha Reid

        Program Manager, National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Concha Reid is the Deputy Chief of the Space Science Project Office at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). In this role she manages the space science project portfolio at GRC and ensures the achievement of space science project objectives. Ms. Reid is the former Deputy Program Manager for the Radioisotope Power Systems Program, which provides radioisotope power and heating for NASA missions and advances the technology for achievement of greater science objectives, particularly to dark, cold lunar and planetary locations and into deep space. Previously, Ms. Reid negotiated and managed bilateral exchange agreements between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) for Orion’s European Service Module (ESM). She led joint NASA-ESA reviews for the completion of ESM integration activities in Europe for NASA, coordinated the delivery of the ESMs for Artemis I and II from Europe to Kennedy Space Center, and led the review to approve the mating of the Orion Crew and Service Module with the ESM. Ms. Reid also formerly served as a battery and energy storage specialist in the GRC Power Division. Ms. Reid holds a BS in electrical engineering from Louisiana State University and an MS in electrical engineering with emphasis on power from Virginia Tech.

    • 8.10 Systems and Technologies for Ascent from Lunar and Planetary Bodies

      This session covers both the individual technologies, the system level interactions and trades, and the issues that influence the design of ascent systems leaving the surface of planetary bodies, such as the Moon, Mars, Phobos and others within our solar system. It addresses issues like the impacts of thermal constraints, propulsion design and performance, GN&C, aerodynamic impacts, and packaging constraints for both crewed and robotic ascent vehicle design. This includes cargo return from the lunar and Martian surface including samples as well as ascent for humans.

      • Tara Polsgrove

        Chief Lander Architect, Human Landing System, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center: Tara Polsgrove is the Chief Lander Architect for the Human Landing System (HLS) Program at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. In that role she provides strategic planning for human and cargo landing and ascent capability development and evolution for future mission needs. She supports agency architecture definition and planning efforts. Prior to this role she served as the lead systems engineer for the HLS program, ensuring robust technical coordination across the NASA and industry teams. She has experience supporting the agency’s strategic planning for human missions to Mars as well and led conceptual design studies and technology trades for human Mars landers and ascent vehicles. She has been with NASA since 2000 and has experience in vehicle design, systems engineering, and programmatic assessments for future human missions to the Moon and Mars. Ms. Polsgrove has a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a Master of Science in Engineering with a Systems Engineering focus from the University of Alabama in Huntsville.

      • Ashley Karp

        Mars Launch Manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Dr. Karp is the SRL Mars Launch Manager as part of a potential Mars Sample Return. She has been the PI for JPL’s Hybrid Propulsion Test Facility. She is the former Chair of the AIAA Hybrid Rocket Propulsion Technical Committee. She earned a Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Stanford University in 2012. and a B.A. in Astrophysics, Physics and Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley in 2005. She has worked on the Mars 2020 propulsion system and has been involved with many mission concept studies

    The Air Vehicle Track is open to any atmospheric vehicle concept ranging from fixed wing, rotary wing, propulsive and buoyant lift applications for Earth-based or other Planetary Atmospheric application (atmospheric referring to the envelope of gases that surrounds any planet or dwarf planets or moons within or outside the solar system). The track houses sessions focused on atmospheric flight applications for piloted, remotely piloted, and autonomous Un-piloted Aerial Systems (UAS) platforms including any aerial vehicle(s). The Air Vehicle Systems and Technologies Track includes five sessions categorized to focus on development, technologies, and innovations in (i) Modeling, Simulation, Flight Testing, and Verification & Validation (V&V); (ii) Autonomy and Artificial Intelligence for Atmospheric Platforms; (iii) Integrated Systems, Sensors, Safety-Critical Hardware, and Avionics; (iv) Air Vehicle Flight Guidance, Navigation, and Control Theory and Application; and (v) Distributed, Cooperative, and Multi-Vehicle GNC.

    • Christopher Elliott

      Principal Research Engineer, CMElliott Applied Science LLC: Christopher M Elliott is a Principal Research Engineer at CMElliott Applied Science LLC, a company that provides innovative solutions for challenges in engineering research and production. With over 25 years of experience in the aerospace industry including roles as a Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Technical Fellow in Flight Control and Vehicle Management Systems, Dr. Elliott has worked on a number of diverse research programs for the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, such as the International Space Station, Block 60 F16, F35 Joint Strike Fighter, and Hybrid Airship. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Texas Christian University and the University of Texas at Arlington, where he teaches and mentors students in mechanical and aerospace engineering. He holds a PhD and an MS in Aerospace Engineering from UT Arlington, and a BS in Aerospace Engineering from UT Austin. He is an AIAA Associate Fellow and the Air Vehicle Chair for the annual IEEE Aerospace Conference and a passionate advocate for advancing the field of aerospace and mechanical engineering; guidance, navigation, and control; modeling, simulation, estimation, and optimization of dynamic systems; and quantum information science.

    • Tom Mc Ateer

      System of Systems Test and Evaluation, NAVAIR: Systems of Systems Test and Evaluation, Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, MD.

    • 9.01 Air Vehicle Modeling and Simulation

      This session focuses on methodology and techniques for the modeling and simulation of atmospheric vehicles including piloted, remotely piloted, and autonomous platforms including fixed wing, rotary wing, and any other aerial vehicle(s). The Air Vehicle Modeling and Simulation is open to any atmospheric vehicle concept including fixed wing, rotary wing, propulsive and buoyant lift applications for Earth-based or other Planetary Atmospheric GNC applications (atmospheric referring to the envelope of gases that surrounds any planet or dwarf planets or moons within or outside the solar system).

      • Will Goins

        Sr. Principal Electronics Engineer, Ierus Technologies : Sr. Principal Electronics Engineer with Ierus Technologies in Huntsville AL, USA. Previously he held research and design positions with commercial companies supporting aerospace and defense customers. His research interests are in aerospace and electronic systems areas, with specific focus in autonomous vehicles and sensors. He holds a B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering

      • Richard Hoobler

        Graduate Research Assistant, University of Texas at Austin: Richard Hoobler has a Bachelor's degree in Aerospace Engineering from Iowa State University and a Master's degree from UT Austin. He is currently working on his PhD at UT Austin under Dr. Maruthi Akella. His research interests are in Aircraft GNC, Adaptive Control, and System Identification.

    • 9.02 Air Vehicle Autonomy and Artificial Intelligence for Atmospheric Platforms

      This session includes papers on all aspects of autonomy and artificial intelligence and machine learning for Air Vehicle applications including piloted, remotely piloted, and autonomous platforms in atmospheric flight. Example topics may include human and automony interaction; real time prognostics and integrity monitoring and mitigation; path planning in dynamic and uncertain environments; conflict detection and resolution; and work from experimental to operational applications.

      • Will Goins

        Sr. Principal Electronics Engineer, Ierus Technologies : Sr. Principal Electronics Engineer with Ierus Technologies in Huntsville AL, USA. Previously he held research and design positions with commercial companies supporting aerospace and defense customers. His research interests are in aerospace and electronic systems areas, with specific focus in autonomous vehicles and sensors. He holds a B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering

      • Kerianne Hobbs

        Aerospace Engineer, Air Force Research Laboratory: Dr. Kerianne Hobbs is the Safe Autonomy and Space Lead on the Autonomy Capability Team (ACT3) at the Air Force Research Laboratory. There she investigates rigorous specification, analysis, bounding, and intervention techniques to enable safe, trusted, ethical, and certifiable autonomous and learning controllers for aircraft and spacecraft applications. Her previous experience includes work in automatic collision avoidance and autonomy verification and validation research. Dr. Hobbs was selected for the 2020 AFCEA 40 Under 40 award and was a member of the team that won the 2018 Collier Trophy (Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System Team), as well as numerous AFRL Awards. She serves on the AIAA Intelligent Systems Technical Committee, the NASA Formal Methods Program Committee, the IEEE Space Mission Challenges for Information Technology - IEEE Space Computing Conference Program Committee, and the IEEE Aerospace Conference Committee. Dr. Hobbs has a BS in Aerospace Engineering from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, an MS in Astronautical Engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

    • 9.03 Air Vehicle Integrated Systems, Sensors, Safety-Critical Hardware, and Avionics

      This session includes a broad focus on topics ranging from integrated systems, sensor technologies and safety critical hardware, and operator feedback and avionics technologies for atmospheric flight applications including piloted, remotely piloted, and autonomous platforms. Papers may address concepts and practices for the design, integration and testing of these systems for improving aircraft performance, operator situational awareness, survivability, energy state, and airspace deconfliction. Novel sensor concepts and sensor fusion, aircraft state estimation, and operator feedback are all important example topics for this session.

      • Andrew Lynch

        General Manager, Tactical Air Support Inc.: Mr. Lynch graduated with merit from the United States Naval Academy in 1992 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering. He is a graduate and former Commanding Officer of the United States Naval Test Pilot School and led the Navy's Specialized and Proven Aircraft Program (PMA-226). He is currently the General Manager of the MRO Services Division, Tactical Air Support Inc.

      • Will Goins

        Sr. Principal Electronics Engineer, Ierus Technologies : Sr. Principal Electronics Engineer with Ierus Technologies in Huntsville AL, USA. Previously he held research and design positions with commercial companies supporting aerospace and defense customers. His research interests are in aerospace and electronic systems areas, with specific focus in autonomous vehicles and sensors. He holds a B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering

      • Thomas Fraser

        Engineer, Lockheed Martin Corp: Tom began his engineering career with a BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Massachusetts: Lowell. He continued education with an MS in Aerospace Engineering from Purdue University. Tom currently works in the avionics hardware and software group for Lockheed Martin.

    • 9.04 Air Vehicle Flight Guidance, Navigation, and Control Theory and Application

      This session focuses on Atmospheric Flight Control and includes theory, application, and future or historical operational example topics ranging from guidance algorithms and path planning; navigation state estimation and sensing and control variable construction; to flight control law loop closure design, synthesis, and evaluation. The Air Vehicle Flight GNC session is open to any atmospheric vehicle concept including piloted, remotely piloted, and autonomous platforms categorically ranging from fixed wing, rotary wing, propulsive and buoyant lift applications for Earth-based or other Planetary Atmospheric GNC applications (atmospheric referring to the envelope of gases that surrounds any planet or dwarf planets or moons within or outside the solar system). Example topics may include linear and nonlinear derivation, analysis and simulation results to experimental or operational flight events and lessons learned.

      • Tom Mc Ateer

        System of Systems Test and Evaluation, NAVAIR: Systems of Systems Test and Evaluation, Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, MD.

      • Christopher Elliott

        Principal Research Engineer, CMElliott Applied Science LLC: Christopher M Elliott is a Principal Research Engineer at CMElliott Applied Science LLC, a company that provides innovative solutions for challenges in engineering research and production. With over 25 years of experience in the aerospace industry including roles as a Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Technical Fellow in Flight Control and Vehicle Management Systems, Dr. Elliott has worked on a number of diverse research programs for the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, such as the International Space Station, Block 60 F16, F35 Joint Strike Fighter, and Hybrid Airship. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Texas Christian University and the University of Texas at Arlington, where he teaches and mentors students in mechanical and aerospace engineering. He holds a PhD and an MS in Aerospace Engineering from UT Arlington, and a BS in Aerospace Engineering from UT Austin. He is an AIAA Associate Fellow and the Air Vehicle Chair for the annual IEEE Aerospace Conference and a passionate advocate for advancing the field of aerospace and mechanical engineering; guidance, navigation, and control; modeling, simulation, estimation, and optimization of dynamic systems; and quantum information science.

      • Richard Hoobler

        Graduate Research Assistant, University of Texas at Austin: Richard Hoobler has a Bachelor's degree in Aerospace Engineering from Iowa State University and a Master's degree from UT Austin. He is currently working on his PhD at UT Austin under Dr. Maruthi Akella. His research interests are in Aircraft GNC, Adaptive Control, and System Identification.

      • Nikolaus Ammann

        Research Scientist, DLR (German Aerospace Center): Nikolaus Ammann received his B.Sc. degree in computer science from the University of Lübeck in 2009. Afterwards he continued his study at the Auckland University of Technology and the University of Lübeck and received the M.Sc degree in 2012. Since then, he works as a research scientist at the German Aerospace Center (DLR). His research activities include sensor fusion, visual navigation for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and spacecraft. Most recently, he was appointed head of a DLR-wide project on counter UAS technologies

    • 9.05 Air Vehicle Distributed, Cooperative, and Multi-Vehicle GNC

      This session focuses on atmospheric flight applications including piloted, remotely piloted, and autonomous platforms utilizing the concept of distributed systems and/or agents either working together cooperatively or competitively in a multiple vehicle environment. Example topics may range from resource allocation and command and control of complex, autonomous systems to self-organization and autonomous operation and decision making. Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) concepts may include the successful design, deployment, operation, evaluation, and certification of any homogeneous or mixed type of multi-vehicular GNC system.

      • Christopher Elliott

        Principal Research Engineer, CMElliott Applied Science LLC: Christopher M Elliott is a Principal Research Engineer at CMElliott Applied Science LLC, a company that provides innovative solutions for challenges in engineering research and production. With over 25 years of experience in the aerospace industry including roles as a Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Technical Fellow in Flight Control and Vehicle Management Systems, Dr. Elliott has worked on a number of diverse research programs for the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, such as the International Space Station, Block 60 F16, F35 Joint Strike Fighter, and Hybrid Airship. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Texas Christian University and the University of Texas at Arlington, where he teaches and mentors students in mechanical and aerospace engineering. He holds a PhD and an MS in Aerospace Engineering from UT Arlington, and a BS in Aerospace Engineering from UT Austin. He is an AIAA Associate Fellow and the Air Vehicle Chair for the annual IEEE Aerospace Conference and a passionate advocate for advancing the field of aerospace and mechanical engineering; guidance, navigation, and control; modeling, simulation, estimation, and optimization of dynamic systems; and quantum information science.

    • 9.06 Air Vehicle Flight Testing, Verification, and Validation

      This session focuses on methodology and techniques for the flight testing, and verification and validation (V&V) of atmospheric vehicles including piloted, remotely piloted, and autonomous platforms including fixed wing, rotary wing, and any other aerial vehicle(s). The Air Vehicle Flight Testing, and V&V session is open to any atmospheric vehicle concept including fixed wing, rotary wing, propulsive and buoyant lift applications for Earth-based or other Planetary Atmospheric GNC applications (atmospheric referring to the envelope of gases that surrounds any planet or dwarf planets or moons within or outside the solar system).

      • Christopher Elliott

        Principal Research Engineer, CMElliott Applied Science LLC: Christopher M Elliott is a Principal Research Engineer at CMElliott Applied Science LLC, a company that provides innovative solutions for challenges in engineering research and production. With over 25 years of experience in the aerospace industry including roles as a Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Technical Fellow in Flight Control and Vehicle Management Systems, Dr. Elliott has worked on a number of diverse research programs for the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, such as the International Space Station, Block 60 F16, F35 Joint Strike Fighter, and Hybrid Airship. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Texas Christian University and the University of Texas at Arlington, where he teaches and mentors students in mechanical and aerospace engineering. He holds a PhD and an MS in Aerospace Engineering from UT Arlington, and a BS in Aerospace Engineering from UT Austin. He is an AIAA Associate Fellow and the Air Vehicle Chair for the annual IEEE Aerospace Conference and a passionate advocate for advancing the field of aerospace and mechanical engineering; guidance, navigation, and control; modeling, simulation, estimation, and optimization of dynamic systems; and quantum information science.

    • Kristin Wortman

      Principal Professional Staff, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory: Principal professional staff, Space Exploration Sector's Space Mission Assurance group at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory located in Laurel, MD. Support EZIE and Dragonfly NASA missions and several National Security Space missions as the lead software assurance engineer. Adjunct professor, Computer Sciences Department, University of Maryland University College since 2001. B.S., Computer and Information Science; M.S., Software Engineering, University of Maryland University College.

    • Virgil Adumitroaie

      Data Scientist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Past research in high-speed turbulent combustion modeling, data dimensionality reduction, neural networks, signaling pathways, decision support, climate data assimilation, and scientific software development. Currently working on planetary atmospheric and magnetospheric modeling. Adjunct Lecturer at the Viterbi School of Engineering, USC. Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, University at Buffalo.

    • 10.01 Computational Modeling

      The focus of this session is Computational Modeling in any discipline, with emphasis on the mathematical model of the phenomenology and on the numerical algorithms used for solution. Disciplines include fluid dynamics and fluid/thermal sciences, earth and planetary physics, systems engineering studies, sensor management and sensor modeling, and radar and signal processing.

      • Virgil Adumitroaie

        Data Scientist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Past research in high-speed turbulent combustion modeling, data dimensionality reduction, neural networks, signaling pathways, decision support, climate data assimilation, and scientific software development. Currently working on planetary atmospheric and magnetospheric modeling. Adjunct Lecturer at the Viterbi School of Engineering, USC. Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, University at Buffalo.

      • Seungwon Lee

        Data Scientist, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Seungwon Lee is a data scientist at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She has over 25 years of experience of research and technology development in computational physics, dynamic systems, statistical data analysis, optimization algorithms, information systems, and high performance computing systems for science and engineering applications. Currently, she is the PI of a NASA ROSES AIST project for developing an ecological projection analytic framework. She is also the PI of a NASA ROSES RDAP project for analyzing Rosetta observation data. In the past, she led several research projects as a PI for the JPL internal Research and Technology Development program and performed innovative research on Earth science data summarization with advanced clustering algorithms, evolutionary optimization methods for spectral retrieval problems and trajectory design, parallel computing for Satellite Orbit Analysis Program. She also contributed to other NASA research projects including the development of a co-location tool for A-Train data and ECMWF outputs, the characterization of cloud properties using NASA’s observational data, development of cloud-related parameterizations for climate models, and the development of a statistical method to quantify the relationships between passive radiometer and active radar measurements for hurricane studies. She is the first author or co-author of over 40 refereed publications.

    • 10.02 Innovative Software Engineering and Management Techniques and Practices

      Practices followed during development and management of aerospace software systems vary across the industry. This divide seems to be growing as emerging markets, such as commercial space and cubesats, adopt techniques from other software domains while the traditional aerospace market works to tailor existing processes. Suggested topics covering both experience and research in software engineering and management techniques with both flight and ground system development such as: innovative software architectures, software management techniques to ensure and measure software progress, effective review processes, COTS integration and code reuse strategies, new design methods, and unique approaches to software test and verification. Other software engineering topics will also be considered in this session.

      • Kristin Wortman

        Principal Professional Staff, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory: Principal professional staff, Space Exploration Sector's Space Mission Assurance group at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory located in Laurel, MD. Support EZIE and Dragonfly NASA missions and several National Security Space missions as the lead software assurance engineer. Adjunct professor, Computer Sciences Department, University of Maryland University College since 2001. B.S., Computer and Information Science; M.S., Software Engineering, University of Maryland University College.

      • Ronnie Killough

        Program Director - R&D, Southwest Research Institute: Ronnie Killough is a Program Director in the Space Science Division at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). In his 30+ years at SwRI, Ronnie has developed software for cruise missile simulators, space shuttle control center systems, and unmanned spacecraft. Until 2014 he was Director of the Communications and Embedded Systems department in which he was responsible for oversight of research and development of network-centric systems, tactical communications systems, cyber security, and high-reliability software. Ronnie returned to his passion for space and served as software systems lead and flight director for the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) mission which launched in December 2016. He is currently Project Manager for a Heliophysics SMEX mission called Polarimeter to Unify the Corina and Heliosphere (PUNCH), a constellation of four microsatellites that will create 3D images of the solar wind, slated for launch in 2025.

    • 10.03 Software Architecture and Design

      Appropriate software architecture is critical to the design, development and evolution of all software systems, and its role in the engineering of software-intensive applications in the aerospace domain has become increasingly important. This session solicits novel ideas on the foundations, languages, models, techniques, tools, and applications of software architecture technology. Topics include software architecture for space mission systems; architecture across software, system and enterprise boundaries; architectural patterns, styles and viewpoints; architecture frameworks; design reasoning, capturing and sharing design decisions; and open architectures, product-line architectures, and systems of systems software architects’ roles and responsibilities.

      • Martin Stelzer

        Research Associate, German Aerospace Center (DLR): Martin Stelzer studied computer science at FH Ingolstadt and the University of Hagen and received his M.Sc. Degree in 2012. Since 2007 he has been working at the German Aerospace Center in the field of onboard software frameworks and was involved in the space projects ROKVISS, Kontur-2, and EROSS IOD.

      • Peter Lehner

        Team Lead Mobile Manipulators, German Aerospace Center (DLR): Peter Lehner is the Mobile Manipulators team lead at the Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics, German Aerospace Center (DLR). Before he joined DLR in 2014, he received his master's degree in Computer Engineering from the Technical University of Berlin in 2014. His current research activities include developing methods for autonomous motion generation for mobile manipulation systems to empower mobile robots to autonomously interact with their environment.

    • 10.04 Software Quality, Reliability and Safety Engineering and Other Illities

      The focus of this session is to share systematic practices followed in aerospace to ensure an adequate confidence level that a software system conforms to its requirements and will perform in a safe and reliable manner. Software quality, reliability and safety engineering covers methodologies and techniques used for assessment of the development cycle, verification, validation and test programs, standards, models, certifications, tools, data analysis and risk management. This session is also a forum for discussion on other illities, such as software maintainability.

      • Kristin Wortman

        Principal Professional Staff, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory: Principal professional staff, Space Exploration Sector's Space Mission Assurance group at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory located in Laurel, MD. Support EZIE and Dragonfly NASA missions and several National Security Space missions as the lead software assurance engineer. Adjunct professor, Computer Sciences Department, University of Maryland University College since 2001. B.S., Computer and Information Science; M.S., Software Engineering, University of Maryland University College.

      • Robert Klar

        Institute Engineer, Southwest Research Institute: Robert Klar has over 28 years of experience in the areas of software engineering, real-time operating systems, embedded systems, signal processing, image processing, computer networking, and communications. He has contributed to flight software for many space missions including PUNCH, CYGNSS, MMS, WISE, Kepler, New Horizons, Orbital Express, Fermi, Swift, and IMAGE. Robert has a B.S. in Computer Engineering from Texas A&M and an M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Saint Mary’s University. He is currently pursuing additional graduate work in Machine Learning at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

    • 10.05 Model-based Systems and Software Engineering

      This session is concerned with the application, or potential application, of advanced model-based approaches, methodologies, techniques, languages, and tools to the aerospace domain. Topics ranging from theoretical and conceptual work in these areas to specific, concrete applications, in scope from small software systems to complex monolithic systems to large system-of-systems, are welcome. Other driving current themes include: coordination and usage of multiple types of models, e.g., digital twins, descriptive versus behavioral models; the use of MBSE simulations and analyses in support of architecture development; the application of information visualization techniques for improved MBSE deliverables; the use of MBSE in specialized domains such as fault protection or electrical systems engineering. The Session's areas of interest including model-based architecture and analysis, design, control systems, verification and testing, simulation, domain specific languages and transformations, aircraft, spacecraft, instruments, flight systems, ground systems, planning and execution, guidance and navigation, and fault management.

      • Aleksandra Markina Khusid

        Department Manager, MITRE Corporation: Aleksandra Markina-Khusid received the B.S. degree in physics, M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering, and the M.S. degree in engineering and management, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA 1999, 2001, 2005, and 2015 respectively. She leads the Systems and Mission Analysis Department, MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA, USA. Her research interests include analytical and quantitative systems engineering and mission engineering, including systems of systems engineering, trade space analysis, and decision support as enabled by the modern digital engineering approaches.

      • Hongman Kim

        Systems Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Hongman Kim is a systems engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Since he joined JPL in 2014, Hongman worked on a number of software development projects including concept design study environment and ontology-based engineering data integration. Currently, he works as software architect of Ingenium that provides a Web-based test procedure authoring and execution environment for system level testing and integration of JPL flight projects. Before joining JPL, he was a project manager at Phoenix Integration, Inc., where he led development of model-based systems engineering (MBSE) technology. He also worked on a number of government funded projects including points cloud visualization, distributed computing, and design optimization. He holds a PhD degree in aerospace engineering from Virginia Tech, and MS and BS degrees in aerospace engineering from Seoul National University.

    • 10.06 Machine Learning / Artificial Intelligence (ML/AI) for Aerospace Applications

      This session considers how to create state-of-the-art single and multi-agent system technologies necessary for developing algorithms, software, or hardware for intelligent, adaptive, and learning systems. Application areas include single and multiple homogeneous or heterogenous platforms and their related systems, e.g., ground movers / stations, single or constellations of spacecraft/satellites, unmanned aerial systems (UAS), etc., including mission systems, and autonomy. Techniques considered will include, but are not limited to, all artificial intelligence, machine learning, and reinforcement learning paradigms, genetic programming and algorithms, swarm intelligence, probabilistic AI, human trust in AI, cooperative multi-agent systems, and training, testing, & verification tools and methodologies. This session invites papers on best practices towards implementing new state-of-the-art autonomy and intelligence systems for aerospace. Papers on novel AI/ML algorithms for single and multi-agent systems including centralized and decentralized protocols, guaranteed stability, robustness, and performance bounds, and comparison with conventional closed-loop control systems are of particular interest.

      • Daniel Clancy

        Senior Research Engineer, Georgia Tech Research Institute: Dan has worked in the aerospace / defense industry for over 25 years. His research interests include machine learning and artificial intelligence; advance battle management, command and control systems; multi-agent decision and game theory; and information fusion, advanced tracking, data association, and target ID techniques. He previously worked for Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company in Fort Worth, TX, where he was a lead designer of the information fusion system for the F-35 Lightning II. He has been an adjunct professor at Texas Christian University in the Department of Engineering. He received his B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Michigan Technological University in 1988, his M.S. degree in electrical engineering from Boston University in 1991, and his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the Ohio State University in 1997.

      • Georges Labrèche

        Spacecraft Operations Engineer, Tanagra Space / European Space Agency: Georges Labrèche develops and operationalizes AI technology demonstrators on-board the European Space Agency's OPS-SAT Space Lab. His research focuses on leveraging edge computing for in-orbit machine learning and autonomous decision-making. He received his B.S. in Software Engineering from the University of Ottawa, Canada, M.A. in International Affairs from the New School University in New York, NY, and M.S. in Spacecraft Design from Luleå University of Technology in Kiruna, Sweden. He founded Tanagra Space, an Estonian-based AI consultancy that supports the OPS-SAT mission control team at ESOC in Darmstadt, Germany. Georges lives in Queens, NY.

    • 10.07 Human-Systems Interaction

      Humans are the most critical element in system safety, reliability, and performance. Their creativity, adaptability, and problem-solving capabilities are key to resilient operations across the different aerospace applications. This session focuses on the technologies and techniques leading to effective interfaces and interaction between humans and spacecraft, robots, and other aerospace systems. Specific topics of interests include HCI-HMI, multimodal sensory integration such as vision, haptics and audio, HCI-HMI for tele-operation interfaces, virtual, augmented and mixed reality environments, scientific visualization and natural user interfaces as applied to design, production, operations, and analysis, as well as training and for decision support. Novel solutions/experiences from other domains and their application in aerospace domain, specifically contributing to an efficient human systems interaction are also of interest.

      • Janki Dodiya

        Professor for Augmented/Virtual Reality and Human Computer Interaction, IU International University of Applied Science: Janki Dodiya is a Professor of Augmented/Virtual Reality and Human Computer Interaction at IU International University in Germany. She received her PhD in Computer Science in the topic of Virtual Environments in 2011, from University of Reading, UK. She thereafter continued her research at the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) for 10 years for the Institute of Transportation Systems and Department of Software for Space Systems & Interactive Visualization, DLR, researching design and evaluation for space systems such as multimodal interaction techniques for a virtual reality simulation for on-orbit servicing (VROOS) and transportation systems such as interaction design for future autonomous vehicles. Her current research interest includes, human computer interaction/multimodal interaction, virtual reality, artificial intelligence and usability engineering including application areas such as Aerospace, Transportation Education, Humanitarian and Art.

      • Andreas Gerndt

        Head of Department, German Aerospace Center (DLR): Prof. Dr. Andreas Gerndt is the head of the department "Visual Computing and Engineering" at German Aerospace Center (DLR). He received his degree in computer science from Technical University, Darmstadt, Germany in 1993. In the position of a research scientist, he also worked at the Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics (IGD) in Germany. Thereafter, he was a software engineer for several companies with focus on Software Engineering and Computer Graphics. In 1999 he continued his studies in Virtual Reality and Scientific Visualization at RWTH Aachen University, Germany, where he received his doctoral degree in computer science. After two years of interdisciplinary research activities as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette, USA, he returned to Germany in 2008 to work for DLR in the domain of aerospace software research. Since 2019, he is also Professor in High-Performance Visualization at University of Bremen, Germany.

    • 10.08 Image Processing and Computer Vision

      The focus of this session is both theoretical and experimental work on Image Processing and Computer Vision in aerospace applications. The disciplines include, but not limited to image-based navigation, image classification, image reconstruction, image segmentation, feature extraction, image compression, object detection and tracking, image correlation, coding and limitations, computational complexity, adaptive algorithms, video coding (e.g., MPEG, H.265), hardware and bandwidth limitations, key improvements, contributions, and lesson learned.

      • Samuel Bibelhauser

        Engineer, JHU-APL: Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of Louisville in Kentucky. Internships at NASA Langley and NASA Goddard, including work on drones and wind tunnels. Work at JHUAPL includes imaging systems, flight software, and drones.

      • Marco Sewtz

        Scientific Staff, German Aerospace Center - DLR: Marco Sewtz is the lead for software and interfaces of the new lunar exploration rover at the German Aerospace Center (DLR). He received his B.Eng. at the University of Applied Sciences of Munich and his M.Sc. at the Technical University of Munich. His interests focuses on SLAM and multi-modal perception of the environment. Before his current role, he worked as an electrical designer for high-performance processing modules for space hardware at Airbus Defence and Space.

      • Timothy Chase

        Ph.D. Candidate/Computer Engineer, University at Buffalo/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center: Timothy is a computer engineer at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and a Ph.D. student in Computer Science and Engineering at the University at Buffalo in the Distributed RObotics and Networked Embedded Sensing (DRONES) Lab under Dr. Karthik Dantu and the Advanced Navigation and Control Systems Lab under Dr. John Crassidis. He received his B.S. in Computer Science and M.S. in Computer Science and Engineering from the University at Buffalo. His research interests include spacecraft perception and autonomy, optical navigation systems, simultaneous localization and mapping, and embedded computer vision.

    • Andrew Hess

      President, The Hess PHM Group, Inc.: Consultant to government and industry on advanced diagnostics, prognostics, data and predictive analytics, CBM, smart manufacturing, health and asset management of machines and engineering systems. Previously program office lead for the JSF PHM effort. Current President of the PHM Society.

    • Wolfgang Fink

      Associate Professor, University of Arizona: Professor Fink is the inaugural Edward & Maria Keonjian Endowed Chair, University of Arizona with joint appointments in the Departments of ECE, BME, SIE, AME, and Ophthalmology & Vision Science. Prof. Fink is named AIMBE Fellow, PHMS Fellow, SPIE Lifetime Fellow, ARVO Fellow, NAI Fellow, UA da Vinci Fellow, UA ACABI Fellow, and Senior Member IEEE. He holds a Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics, University of Tübingen, Germany. Among numerous awards Prof. Fink received: NASA Space Flight Awareness (SFA) Launch Honoree Award in 2002, co-recipient of the 2009 R&D Magazine’s R&D 100 and R&D 100 Editors’ Choice Award both for the DOE-funded Artificial Retina Project, co-recipient of the 2009 NASA Board Award for pioneering work on a disruptive autonomous space exploration paradigm, co-winner of the $200,000 DOE/NREL-sponsored E-ROBOT Prize in 2021, and recipient of the 2023 SPIE Meinel Technology Achievement Award.

    • 11.01 PHM for Aerospace Systems, Subsystems, Components, Electronics, and Structures

      Advanced Diagnostics and PHM can be and is applied separately or concurrently at the device, component, subsystem, structure, system and/or total platform levels. This session will give PHM developers, practitioners, integrators, and users a chance to discuss their capabilities and experiences at any or all of these application levels. Discussion of the integration of PHM capabilities across these various levels of application is welcome and encouraged. Applications involving propulsion systems, fuel management, flight control, EHAS, drive systems, and structures are particularly solicited.

      • Andrew Hess

        President, The Hess PHM Group, Inc.: Consultant to government and industry on advanced diagnostics, prognostics, data and predictive analytics, CBM, smart manufacturing, health and asset management of machines and engineering systems. Previously program office lead for the JSF PHM effort. Current President of the PHM Society.

      • David He

        Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago: David He received a Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from The University of Iowa. Dr. He is a Professor and Director of the Industrial AI and PHM Integration Laboratory in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at The University of Illinois-Chicago. Dr. He is also a Fellow of the Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) Society. Dr. He’s research areas include PHM, Industrial AI, smart manufacturing systems modeling and analysis, quality and reliability engineering.

    • 11.02 PHM for Autonomous Platforms and Control Systems Applications

      This session focuses on diagnostics and prognostics for autonomous system applications and control systems. This would include autonomous system architectures, electronic controls, control systems, and electronic systems for both the item under control and the controlling system. Methods for autonomous decision making, fault detection, rate of progression, and consequence or mission risk are encouraged. The session also is looking for novel technical approaches to use diagnostic and prognostic information to provide control input adjustments that can slow or reverse fault progression.

      • Derek De Vries

        Senior Fellow, Nothrop Grumman Propulsion Systems: Mr. Derek R. DeVries, P.E., Senior Fellow and Discipline Owner for Avionics and Controls at Northrop Grumman Propulsion Systems. Senior Member of IEEE with over 30 years’ experience in the Aerospace Industry in Operation, Integration, and Development of Space Launch Systems. PHM Society Fellow, Board of Directors, and Honored as a Luminary Speaker for the PHM 2015 Conference. B.Sc Electrical Engineering from University of Utah, and M.Sc. Electrical Engineering from Utah State University. Industrial Advisory Board Member for the University of Utah Electrical Engineering, AIAA Standards Committee NATO Scientific Achievement Award 2016 "Application of Integrated Munitions health Management", Member for AIAA “S-122-2006 Direct Current Power Systems for Earth-Orbiting Satellites”, 15 U.S./Foreign Patents, and AIAA 2001 JPC Arthur D. Rhea Best Paper Award for "Ordnance Components and Systems". Research/Development interests include advanced Avionics and Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) of integrated systems.

      • Wolfgang Fink

        Associate Professor, University of Arizona: Professor Fink is the inaugural Edward & Maria Keonjian Endowed Chair, University of Arizona with joint appointments in the Departments of ECE, BME, SIE, AME, and Ophthalmology & Vision Science. Prof. Fink is named AIMBE Fellow, PHMS Fellow, SPIE Lifetime Fellow, ARVO Fellow, NAI Fellow, UA da Vinci Fellow, UA ACABI Fellow, and Senior Member IEEE. He holds a Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics, University of Tübingen, Germany. Among numerous awards Prof. Fink received: NASA Space Flight Awareness (SFA) Launch Honoree Award in 2002, co-recipient of the 2009 R&D Magazine’s R&D 100 and R&D 100 Editors’ Choice Award both for the DOE-funded Artificial Retina Project, co-recipient of the 2009 NASA Board Award for pioneering work on a disruptive autonomous space exploration paradigm, co-winner of the $200,000 DOE/NREL-sponsored E-ROBOT Prize in 2021, and recipient of the 2023 SPIE Meinel Technology Achievement Award.

    • 11.03 PHM System Design Attributes, Architectures, and Assessments

      Design of complex systems, such as aircraft and space vehicles, requires complex trade-offs among requirements related to performance, safety, reliability, and life cycle cost. The development of effective architectures and implementation strategies are extremely important. This session will focus on the application of methods such as testability, diagnosability, embedding sensors, prognostics, remaining useful life estimates used to design complex aerospace systems, and architectures to design, enable, and implement complex aerospace systems. We invite papers discussing new methodologies, lessons learned in application of health management methods in system design, and operational experience with health management capabilities embedded into systems early in the design process.

      • Andrew Hess

        President, The Hess PHM Group, Inc.: Consultant to government and industry on advanced diagnostics, prognostics, data and predictive analytics, CBM, smart manufacturing, health and asset management of machines and engineering systems. Previously program office lead for the JSF PHM effort. Current President of the PHM Society.

      • Derek De Vries

        Senior Fellow, Nothrop Grumman Propulsion Systems: Mr. Derek R. DeVries, P.E., Senior Fellow and Discipline Owner for Avionics and Controls at Northrop Grumman Propulsion Systems. Senior Member of IEEE with over 30 years’ experience in the Aerospace Industry in Operation, Integration, and Development of Space Launch Systems. PHM Society Fellow, Board of Directors, and Honored as a Luminary Speaker for the PHM 2015 Conference. B.Sc Electrical Engineering from University of Utah, and M.Sc. Electrical Engineering from Utah State University. Industrial Advisory Board Member for the University of Utah Electrical Engineering, AIAA Standards Committee NATO Scientific Achievement Award 2016 "Application of Integrated Munitions health Management", Member for AIAA “S-122-2006 Direct Current Power Systems for Earth-Orbiting Satellites”, 15 U.S./Foreign Patents, and AIAA 2001 JPC Arthur D. Rhea Best Paper Award for "Ordnance Components and Systems". Research/Development interests include advanced Avionics and Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) of integrated systems.

    • 11.04 Non-Destructive Testing and Sensor Technologies for PHM Applications

      This session is designed to bring together researchers and engineers developing sensors applicable to SHM and IVHM. Papers are invited on MEMS, MOEMS, nanotechnology, BIOS, quantum dots, chemical sensors, optical sensors, and imaging sensors that can be integrated with nondestructive testing applications for structural health monitoring and diagnostics. Description of novel and disruptive sensor technologies is solicited.

      • Morteza Safai

        Sensors Engineer / Technical Fellow, Boeing Company: Senior Sensors Engineer & Technical Fellow at the Boeing Research and Technology. 30 years of experience with opto electrical sensors, x-ray CT, X-ray backscattering, X-ray line scans, infrared, laser, MEMS, UT and nondestructive testing and Imaging for aerospace, food and medical industries. Holds over 400 patent, patents pending and publications. BS and MS Physics University of Utah.

      • David He

        Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago: David He received a Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from The University of Iowa. Dr. He is a Professor and Director of the Industrial AI and PHM Integration Laboratory in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at The University of Illinois-Chicago. Dr. He is also a Fellow of the Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) Society. Dr. He’s research areas include PHM, Industrial AI, smart manufacturing systems modeling and analysis, quality and reliability engineering.

    • 11.05 PHM for Non-Aerospace Applications

      This session seeks contributions in non-aerospace but related applications, e.g., automotive industry, trains, marine, oil & gas, etc. Both programmatic and technology presentations are solicited, particularly those focused on capabilities, cost benefits, and lessons learned.

      • Andrew Hess

        President, The Hess PHM Group, Inc.: Consultant to government and industry on advanced diagnostics, prognostics, data and predictive analytics, CBM, smart manufacturing, health and asset management of machines and engineering systems. Previously program office lead for the JSF PHM effort. Current President of the PHM Society.

      • David He

        Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago: David He received a Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from The University of Iowa. Dr. He is a Professor and Director of the Industrial AI and PHM Integration Laboratory in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at The University of Illinois-Chicago. Dr. He is also a Fellow of the Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) Society. Dr. He’s research areas include PHM, Industrial AI, smart manufacturing systems modeling and analysis, quality and reliability engineering.

    • 11.06 PHM for Commercial Space Applications

      This session seeks papers on diagnostics, prognostics, health management (PHM) and autonomous fault management for satellites, satellite in-space servicing, and other commercial space applications (e.g., asteroid mining, etc.). Papers are sought in the areas of satellites, launch vehicles, and other new space ventures (e.g., tourism, natural resource exploitation). Papers may address research, actual flight experience, and future planning related to satellite and launch vehicle PHM and fault management.

      • Wolfgang Fink

        Associate Professor, University of Arizona: Professor Fink is the inaugural Edward & Maria Keonjian Endowed Chair, University of Arizona with joint appointments in the Departments of ECE, BME, SIE, AME, and Ophthalmology & Vision Science. Prof. Fink is named AIMBE Fellow, PHMS Fellow, SPIE Lifetime Fellow, ARVO Fellow, NAI Fellow, UA da Vinci Fellow, UA ACABI Fellow, and Senior Member IEEE. He holds a Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics, University of Tübingen, Germany. Among numerous awards Prof. Fink received: NASA Space Flight Awareness (SFA) Launch Honoree Award in 2002, co-recipient of the 2009 R&D Magazine’s R&D 100 and R&D 100 Editors’ Choice Award both for the DOE-funded Artificial Retina Project, co-recipient of the 2009 NASA Board Award for pioneering work on a disruptive autonomous space exploration paradigm, co-winner of the $200,000 DOE/NREL-sponsored E-ROBOT Prize in 2021, and recipient of the 2023 SPIE Meinel Technology Achievement Award.

      • Andrew Hess

        President, The Hess PHM Group, Inc.: Consultant to government and industry on advanced diagnostics, prognostics, data and predictive analytics, CBM, smart manufacturing, health and asset management of machines and engineering systems. Previously program office lead for the JSF PHM effort. Current President of the PHM Society.

      • Derek De Vries

        Senior Fellow, Nothrop Grumman Propulsion Systems: Mr. Derek R. DeVries, P.E., Senior Fellow and Discipline Owner for Avionics and Controls at Northrop Grumman Propulsion Systems. Senior Member of IEEE with over 30 years’ experience in the Aerospace Industry in Operation, Integration, and Development of Space Launch Systems. PHM Society Fellow, Board of Directors, and Honored as a Luminary Speaker for the PHM 2015 Conference. B.Sc Electrical Engineering from University of Utah, and M.Sc. Electrical Engineering from Utah State University. Industrial Advisory Board Member for the University of Utah Electrical Engineering, AIAA Standards Committee NATO Scientific Achievement Award 2016 "Application of Integrated Munitions health Management", Member for AIAA “S-122-2006 Direct Current Power Systems for Earth-Orbiting Satellites”, 15 U.S./Foreign Patents, and AIAA 2001 JPC Arthur D. Rhea Best Paper Award for "Ordnance Components and Systems". Research/Development interests include advanced Avionics and Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) of integrated systems.

    • 11.07 PHM for Human Health and Performance

      This session is an effort to bridge PHM to Space Medicine as part of Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) and healthcare domains as applied to High Value Human Asset. PHM4HHP is focused on tracking status of very healthy individuals 24/7, as well as ensuring a sustained top-level performance required on manned space exploration missions. Papers are sought that show how systems engineering and MBSE with PHM techniques and methodologies, such as predictive analytics, predictive diagnostics, root cause analysis, virtual sensors, data and information fusion, data mining, and big data analytics with computationally generated biomarkers can serve as a scientific and engineering foundation for building both evidence-based and analytics-based individual health maintenance/support for human assets. Objectives include developing and demonstrating PHM capabilities for assessing, tracking, predicting, and ultimately improving long-term individual human health status to ensure mission success.

      • Alexandre Popov

        NASA Emeritus Docent at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center and AIAA Systems Engineering Technical Committee (SETC) Member, McGill University: currently working on MBSE and PHM-based technologies with predictive diagnostics capability to maintain/support crew health (Human Health and Performance (HHP)) on the ISS program and future manned space exploration missions. His efforts on "PHM for Astronauts" project within US/Canadian/Russian collaboration framework are focused on a paradigm shift from telemedicine to HHP autonomy based on systems engineering concepts, methods and techniques, which are to identify precursors and computationally generated biomarkers of impending health issues, that otherwise would have gone undetected. Contributed to three manned space programs: BURAN space transportation system (1983-1988), Mir space station (1988-1998), and the ISS program at RSC-Energia (1996-1998), Lockheed Martin Canada (2000-2003) and Canadian Space Agency (CSA) (2003-2014). Ran a project enabling Crew Electronic Health Records (CEHR) technology on the ISS program and led CSA efforts on system requirements and conceptual prototype development. AIAA SETC member since 2009. AIAA Senior Member.

      • Wolfgang Fink

        Associate Professor, University of Arizona: Professor Fink is the inaugural Edward & Maria Keonjian Endowed Chair, University of Arizona with joint appointments in the Departments of ECE, BME, SIE, AME, and Ophthalmology & Vision Science. Prof. Fink is named AIMBE Fellow, PHMS Fellow, SPIE Lifetime Fellow, ARVO Fellow, NAI Fellow, UA da Vinci Fellow, UA ACABI Fellow, and Senior Member IEEE. He holds a Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics, University of Tübingen, Germany. Among numerous awards Prof. Fink received: NASA Space Flight Awareness (SFA) Launch Honoree Award in 2002, co-recipient of the 2009 R&D Magazine’s R&D 100 and R&D 100 Editors’ Choice Award both for the DOE-funded Artificial Retina Project, co-recipient of the 2009 NASA Board Award for pioneering work on a disruptive autonomous space exploration paradigm, co-winner of the $200,000 DOE/NREL-sponsored E-ROBOT Prize in 2021, and recipient of the 2023 SPIE Meinel Technology Achievement Award.

    • 11.08 PHM and Digital Engineering and Transformation

      This session solicits contributions in the areas of PHM applications focused around the recent Digital Twin and Digital Thread paradigm, Model Based System Engineering, and Enterprise-wide Digital Transformation in aerospace and associated industries. Of particular interest are solutions, architectures, and technologies that leverage or enhance the use of DTs and MBSE for end-to-end PHM management and the delivery of enhanced overall situation awareness.

      • Andrew Hess

        President, The Hess PHM Group, Inc.: Consultant to government and industry on advanced diagnostics, prognostics, data and predictive analytics, CBM, smart manufacturing, health and asset management of machines and engineering systems. Previously program office lead for the JSF PHM effort. Current President of the PHM Society.

      • Mark Walker

        Director AI, Autonomous Systems, End to End Enterprise Solutions: Mark Walker received his BSEE from Cal Poly University, Pomona (1990), and his MSCompEng from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (1994), where he specialized in machine intelligence. He has been working in applied artificial intelligence since 1989, and has co-authored four patents in the field. His work with HUMS and PHM began with BFGoodrich Aerospace, Vergennes, VT in 1996. He also worked 6 years as Senior Consulting Engineer for expert system manufacturer Gensym Corporation and 10 years as Lead Engineer, Intelligent Systems for General Atomics, where he led GA in the development of reusable PHM systems applied to various industries. He founded D2K Technologies in 2014, a solution provider of intelligent model-based reasoning systems for mission critical systems. D2K was acquired by End to End Enterprise Solutions (E3S) in 2023, for whom he currently serves as Director, AI and Autonomous Systems. He also serves as a PHM and AO SME for NASA, with active projects at SSC, JSC, and KSC. He resides with his family in Oceanside, California.

    • 11.09 Panel: PHM from a Practitioner’s Perspective – a Potpourri of Capabilities, Issues, Case Studies, and Lessons Learned

      Practitioners in the PHM field are solicited to share their experiences and observations as part of a distinguished panel of experts. A short presentation will be required of all participants that describes their focus topic within the PHM and CBM+ domains. This session will cover a broad range of research, lessons-learned experiences and application topics covering the challenges and innovative engineering and/or business approaches associated with the development and implementation of PHM capabilities and CBM+ architectures. The session will feature presentations by senior leaders in the field and a panel discussion. Panel members from PHM communities, academia, government, and industry, will focus on strategies that have resolved or will resolve historical issues, and challenges, and provide insight. Interested parties should contact the session organizers.

      • Andrew Hess

        President, The Hess PHM Group, Inc.: Consultant to government and industry on advanced diagnostics, prognostics, data and predictive analytics, CBM, smart manufacturing, health and asset management of machines and engineering systems. Previously program office lead for the JSF PHM effort. Current President of the PHM Society.

      • Derek De Vries

        Senior Fellow, Nothrop Grumman Propulsion Systems: Mr. Derek R. DeVries, P.E., Senior Fellow and Discipline Owner for Avionics and Controls at Northrop Grumman Propulsion Systems. Senior Member of IEEE with over 30 years’ experience in the Aerospace Industry in Operation, Integration, and Development of Space Launch Systems. PHM Society Fellow, Board of Directors, and Honored as a Luminary Speaker for the PHM 2015 Conference. B.Sc Electrical Engineering from University of Utah, and M.Sc. Electrical Engineering from Utah State University. Industrial Advisory Board Member for the University of Utah Electrical Engineering, AIAA Standards Committee NATO Scientific Achievement Award 2016 "Application of Integrated Munitions health Management", Member for AIAA “S-122-2006 Direct Current Power Systems for Earth-Orbiting Satellites”, 15 U.S./Foreign Patents, and AIAA 2001 JPC Arthur D. Rhea Best Paper Award for "Ordnance Components and Systems". Research/Development interests include advanced Avionics and Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) of integrated systems.

    • Mona Witkowski

      Project Manager / Deputy Project Manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: OCO-2 Project Manager, CloudSat Deputy Project Manager and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Follow-On Operations Mission Manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Over 40 years of experience at JPL in spacecraft development, operations, risk management and mission assurance. Recipient of NASA Exceptional Service Medal for TOPEX/Poseidon Mission Assurance and NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal for Deep Space Network Risk Management.

    • Michael Machado

      International Earth Science Constellation Mission Operations Manager, NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center: Mike has nearly 30 years of Mission Operations experience as either a contractor or civil servant at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. He advanced through the ranks as an online flight operations spacecraft analyst, mission planner, spacecraft lead engineer and manager. He has supported both Space Science Mission Operations (SSMO) and Earth Science Mission Operations (ESMO) covering a diverse group of science gathering missions in orbits ranging from near earth to geosynchronous and deep space). He has worked all phases of mission operations: pre-launch, integration and testing, launch & early orbit, normal, decommissioning and end of mission. Most recently, Mike has been the International Earth Science Constellation Mission Operations Manager as well as the Associate Branch Head for the GSFC Mission Validation and Operations Branch (Code 584). In these roles, Mike has enjoyed building relationships with mission representatives both internal to NASA and from other agencies (NOAA, USAF, USGS, etc) and international partners (CNES, DLR, ESA, JAXA, etc). In his free time, Mike enjoys trying to keep up with several hobbies such as tennis, soccer, poker, disc golf, science fiction and travel with his family (wife and toddler).

    • 12.01 Orbital, Surface and Payload/Instrument Mission Operations

      This session solicits papers which highlight innovative approaches for conducting spacecraft orbital, surface and payload/instrument mission operations. Responding to in-flight anomalies, mission operations challenges, automation, risk reduction and space debris collision avoidance are also topics that are encouraged. Additional topics solicited include: challenges to managing single or multi-mission operations, managing multiple payloads, operating satellite constellations, small satellite operations, team development, staffing, cost reduction and lessons learned for future missions.

      • Mona Witkowski

        Project Manager / Deputy Project Manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: OCO-2 Project Manager, CloudSat Deputy Project Manager and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Follow-On Operations Mission Manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Over 40 years of experience at JPL in spacecraft development, operations, risk management and mission assurance. Recipient of NASA Exceptional Service Medal for TOPEX/Poseidon Mission Assurance and NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal for Deep Space Network Risk Management.

      • Heidi Hallowell

        Staff Consultant GNC Engineer, Ball Aerospace: Heidi Hallowell received B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte in Electrical Engineering. During her 21 years at Ball, Heidi has worked in a variety of GNC roles including spacecraft design and development, simulators, on-orbit commissioning, and spacecraft operation. These programs have included both LEO and interplanetary spacecraft. She has been the CloudSat ADCS lead since 2018 and is also the lead ADCS engineer for the S-NPP and JPSS-1/NOAA-20 programs.

    • 12.02 Mission Planning, Mission Operations Systems and Ground Architectures

      This session focuses on the design, development and implementation of mission operations systems, ground data systems and flight-ground interfaces. Topics may include: methods and technologies that support all aspects of mission design, development, planning, testing, and operations. This can include areas related to uplink (e.g., procedures, planning, scheduling, commanding/sequencing), downlink (e.g., telemetry and data processing and analysis, and response) and strategic planning. We also welcome ideas related to the design, integration, and automation of efficient ground systems. Submissions will be evaluated primarily on novelty, technical innovation, and broader impact to the planning and operations communities.

      • Kedar Naik

        Staff Consultant - AI Technical Lead, BAE Systems, Space & Mission Systems: Kedar Naik is a Staff Consultant and Artificial Intelligence Technical Lead at BAE Space & Mission Systems. He specializes in machine-learning applications related to spacecraft autonomy, thermal control, adaptive optics, spectral remote sensing, and ground operations. Prior to joining Ball, he was at Northrop Grumman, researching the application of machine learning to cyber-security problems. His professional and research interests lie in machine learning, design optimization, and computational math. He has a Ph.D. from Stanford University, where he was a member of the Aerospace Design Lab, under the direction of Prof. Juan Alonso. He was an NDSEG Fellow from 2009 to 2013 and – during the course of his academic career – he completed internships at NASA Langley, NASA Glenn, the U.S. Army’s Aeroflightdynamics Directorate, and Pratt & Whitney. In addition to his doctorate, he holds a master’s degree from Stanford University and a bachelor’s from the University of Southern California.

      • Rob Lange

        Mission System Systems Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Rob Lange is a Mission System Systems Engineer (MSSE) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with more than 20 years experience developing and operating flagship class missions. Rob is currently the MSSE for the Sample Retrieval Lander mission. He was the Mars 2020 Mission Planning Lead, and later the MSSE and surface operations commissioning Phase Lead. Previously, Rob worked on the Mars Science Laboratory in Mission System development and operations teams as commissioning phase planning lead, surface phase system engineering, surface operations strategic planning. Prior experience includes Mars Exploration Rovers science operations and Cassini spacecraft operations science planning engineer. Rob received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Michigan and M.S. in Systems Engineering from the University of Southern California.

    • 12.03 Human Space Flight Development, Processing, and Operations

      This session focuses on all aspects of Human Spaceflight development, processing, and operations across all mission phases, including the development of commercial human spaceflight transportation and destination capabilities in LEO and beyond including the Commercial Crew and Commercial LEO Development Programs. Research topics include the design, development and operations of manned spacecraft and extraterrestrial destination hardware and support systems. Operations research focused on human pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight activities is also encouraged. Additionally, research dedicated to specific areas such as mission analogs, flight operations including IVA and EVA, launching, landing, and recovery of crewed spacecraft, and the effects on human beings during all mission types and phases is also encouraged.

      • Michael Lee

        Deputy Manager, Mission Management & Integration, NASA - Kennedy Space Center: NASA Deputy Manager, Mission Management & Integration, Commercial Crew Program, Kennedy Space Center; 36 years experience in spacecraft mission & ground operations, Systems Integration, and Project Management. Was the NASA Mission Manager for the SpaceX Demo 1 mission to ISS in March 2019. Earned a B.S., in Aerospace Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, and a M.S., in Space Systems Operations, Florida Institute of Technology.

      • William Koenig

        Production Operations Lead, NASA - Kennedy Space Center: William J Koenig Received a B.S. Degree in Marine Transportation from the United States Merchant Marine Academy and a M.S. Degree in Industrial Engineering from the University of Central Florida. He worked in the maritime industry for 8 years before entering the aerospace industry and supporting the Space Shuttle Program in numerous managerial positions for 20 years. In 2007 William joined NASA as the ORION Program Lead for Production Operations. He is presently responsible for supporting the fabrication, transportation, assembly, integration and checkout of the Artemis ORION spacecraft and associated components at Kennedy Space Center.

    • 12.04 Resilient and Cyber Secure Systems for Mission Operations

      Cyber secure, resilient space systems are necessary to ensure continuity of operations and operators ability to execute their missions successfully. This session welcomes novel approaches, tailored to the aerospace domain, for ground systems as well as those spanning both space and ground segments. Examples of resilient operational technologies and systems include: cryptography, architectures (e.g. Zero Trust Architectures (ZTA)), compute and network infrastructure (e.g. redundant, failover systems), software, root of trust (RoT), intrusion detection/prevention, vulnerability/red team assessments, approaches to simplify and streamline Risk Management Framework (RMF) implementations, access control and others. We are also interested in applications of advanced technologies like AI-based analytics, blockchain, active defense, embedded agents, lessons learned in attempted attacks/breaches. Note: if presenting on vulnerabilities, please follow responsible disclosure practices to ensure operators' abilities to protect their systems.

      • John Kenworthy

        Senior Manager Manager, BAE Systems: Mr. John Kenworthy is a Senior Manager at BAE Systems/Space and Mission Systems focused on a portfolio providing mission resiliency and survivability. John manages the Military Space system strategy, technology roadmaps, cultivating novel technologies, delivering operational systems, and capturing new business within this portfolio. Prior to working at BAE, as a U.S. Air Force civilian, John conducted cyber security vulnerability research, analysis, and assessments for satellite programs. He developed his cyber security skills focusing on national critical infrastructure conducting red team events to inform customers of potential security vulnerabilities and training customers in how to mitigate cyber security risks. At Lockheed Martin, John developed spacecraft fault protection and the flight software/systems team, supporting flight operations and software development for numerous NASA interplanetary spacecraft missions. As a fault protection engineer, John was on-console supporting mission operations for many interplanetary spacecraft critical events and anomaly recoveries. John holds a bachelor’s degree in Mathematics and Computer Science from the University of Puget Sound and a master’s degree in Computer Science from the University of Denver. John attended the Budapest Semesters in Mathematics program as a National Security Education Program David L. Boren Scholar.

    • 12.05 Automation and Machine Learning Applications in Spacecraft Operations

      This session invites contributions that are concerned with the applications of machine learning and data science techniques to deal with the increasing amounts of data being collected in spacecraft operations on flight and/or ground segments. These techniques could be related to any subsystem of the spacecraft, including telecom, power, thermal, or specific instrument data and that of the ground segments. Topics ranging from theoretical and conceptual treatment in these areas to specific and operational treatments are solicited. The benefits of these techniques are very wide in scope from enhancing operator productivity by providing diagnostic tools that detect and explain causes of anomalous behavior either in real-time or by post-processing, to automating mission operations. These benefits are also crucial for smaller missions, such as the emerging CubeSats missions, that typically have very lean teams. Some consideration is made for the computing platforms required for the algorithms.

      • Zaid Towfic

        Group Supervisor, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Zaid Towfic holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Computer Science and Mathematics from the University of Iowa. He received his Electrical Engineering M.S. in 2009 and Ph.D. in 2014, both from UCLA, where he focused on signal processing, machine learning, and stochastic optimization. After receiving his Ph. D., Zaid joined the MIT Lincoln Laboratory where he worked on distributed beam forming and geolocation, interference excision via subspace methods, simultaneous communication, and electronic warfare. Zaid joined the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in January of 2017 and has been focused on machine learning and signal processing efforts. He is currently the group supervisor of the Reprogrammable Signal Processing Group of the Flight Telecommunication Section.

      • Dennis Ogbe

        Signal Analysis Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Dennis O. Ogbe (S’13, M’20) is a member of the Reprogrammable Signal Processing group at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA. Prior to joining JPL, he was a postdoctoral associate in the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech in Arlington, VA, followed by a stint as a software-defined radio engineer at Lynk in Falls Church, VA. He holds a B.S. in electrical engineering from Tennessee Technological University and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Purdue University. His research interests are in the fields of communication theory, signal processing, computer engineering, and their application to aerospace engineering problems.

    • 12.06 Robotics, Autonomy and Operations

      This sessions addresses the challenges and opportunities of space robotics autonomy and operations. Topics include autonomous systems, robotics, perception, machine learning, AI and their practical application to space robotics. Papers are solicited that discuss approaches for operating spacecraft with autonomous capabilities, advances in onboard and ground automation and tools, software and systems engineering for operability, fault tolerance and recovery, and human-robot interaction for both manned and unmanned missions. Approaches that address the unique challenges that come with operating robots in space, such as risk, uncertainty, harsh environment, communication delays, and limited resources are also encouraged, as are analyses of successes and challenges, highlights of latest trends, technologies, and best practices that can be leveraged to operate robots effectively in space.

      • Vandi Verma

        Deputy Manager Mobility and Robotic Systems Section, NASA JPL-Caltech: Vandi Verma is the Deputy Manager for Mobility and Robotics Systems at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the Chief Engineer of Robotic Operations for the Mars 2020 mission with the Perseverance rover and Ingenuity helicopter. As Deputy Manager for Mobility and Robotics she leads about 200 JPL roboticists developing new technology for future missions and working on a variety of JPL robotic missions. Robotics capabilities she has worked on are in regular use on the Perseverance, and Curiosity rovers, and in human spaceflight projects. She has been engaged in robotic operations on Mars since 2008 with the Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity, Curiosity rover, Perseverance rover, and Ingenuity helicopter. She graduated from CMU RI with a Ph.D. in Robotics in 2005.

      • Alexandra Holloway

        Flight Software Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Alexandra Holloway leads JPL's Mars Science Laboratory flight software team in developing new capabilities and fixing bugs with embedded software on Mars. Also a member of the data management team, she assesses file system data coming from the spacecraft and writes uplink products to keep the hard drives squeaky clean. Previously, Alexandra used ethnographic techniques to understand Deep Space Network operators' the workflows and design new tools for improved efficiency in a bursty environment.

    Track 13 reports new approaches for development and operation of aerospace systems including: systems architecture, engineering, and system of systems; project and risk management; cost and schedule management; design, development, and testing; conceptual design methods; simulation and verification; verification & validation and I&T; and technology planning, management, and infusion. The Track also reports on how the new approaches performed during mission operations.

    • Jeffery Webster

      Senior Systems Engineer, retired, NASA / Caltech / Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Retired Senior Systems Engineer. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Project Support Lead-Project Support Office; Mission Systems Concepts Section-Mars Trace Gas Orbiter; Project Planner & Systems Engineering; Associate Engineer, Mission & Systems Concepts Section. Publications and awards available upon request.

    • Torrey Radcliffe

      Chief Technologist for Civil Programs, Aerospace Corporation: Associate Director, Space Architecture Department, The Aerospace Corporation. Background in preliminary spacecraft design, space architecture development and portfolio analysis of manned and unmanned systems. S.B, S.M. and PhD in Aeronautics and Astronautics from MIT.

    • 13.01 Systems Architecture, Engineering and System of Systems

      This session is dedicated to papers dealing with the fundamental challenges associated with architecting and high level systems engineering of large-scale systems and systems-of-systems, including development and application of tools and techniques that support both architecting and system engineering processes (e.g., Architecture Descriptions, Model Based Systems Engineering, Architecture Decision Support), maintaining the integrity of “the architecture” across the project lifecycle, and discussions of successful (and not so successful) architecting and systems engineering endeavors with an emphasis on the lessons learned.

      • Lisa May

        NextGen Strategy & BD Sr Manager, Lockheed Martin Space: Lisa May is an accomplished senior executive and systems engineer with more than 35 years of success across aerospace and technology industries. She is currently Lockheed Martin’s Deep Space Exploration Strategy & BD Lead for Commercial Civil Space. Her portfolio includes robotic science solutions, including deep space planetary missions. Previously, she was the the Commercial Civil Space Chief Technologist. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, Ms. May founded Murphian Consulting, where she consulted to technology entrepreneurs in such diverse fields as nuclear, forensics, space, and transportation technology. Before that she was NASA's Lead Program Executive for the Mars Exploration Program and PE for MAVEN, Mars Technology, and Mars Sample Return. Also, former Chair of the International Mars Exploration Working Group. Lisa is an IEEE senior member, an AIAA Associate Fellow, an AAS Fellow, and an INCOSE Expert Systems Engineering Professional. Lisa has an ME in Mechanical Engineering and BA in Speech Communications, from the University of Virginia.

      • Daniel Selva

        Associate Professor, Texas A&M University: Dr. Daniel Selva is Assistant Professor of Aerospace Engineering at Texas A&M University. His research interests focus on the application of knowledge engineering, global optimization and machine learning techniques to space systems engineering and architecture, with a strong focus on space systems. Daniel received his PhD in Space Systems from MIT in 2012. Prior to that, he worked for four years in Kourou (French Guiana) as a member of the Ariane 5 Launch team. Daniel has a dual background in electrical engineering and aeronautical engineering, with degrees from Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya in Barcelona, Spain, and Supaero in Toulouse, France. He is an AIAA Senior Member, a member of the AIAA Intelligent Systems Technical Committee, and of the European Space Agency's Advisory Committee for Earth Observation.

      • Dean Bucher

        Principal Director, The Aerospace Corporation: Mr. Dean Bucher is the Principal Director of Digital Engineering Integration at The Aerospace Corporation, where he leads the digital engineering (DE) transformation of Aerospace. In this role, Mr. Bucher is responsible for providing strategic direction to all corporately funded DE initiatives and ensuring that these efforts are highly integrated to contribute to the broader strategic vision for digital engineering. He also works across numerous, emerging customer DE efforts to better identify opportunities and integrate these for the benefit of the National Security Space (NSS) and Civil Space enterprises. Mr. Bucher joined The Aerospace Corporation in 2005 as a Member of the Technical Staff. He holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Missouri and an MS in Aerospace Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and he is currently pursuing a PhD in Systems Engineering from Colorado State University.

    • 13.02 Management and Risk Tools, Methods and Processes

      This session addresses tools, methods, and processes for managing aerospace system development programs/projects, mission operations, technology development programs, systems engineering organizations, and artificial intelligence (AI)/machine learning (ML) programs/projects related to the aerospace domain. Topics include analyzing risks; managing all life cycle phases of programs/projects; using project-level management disciplines including project management, systems engineering, scheduling, safety and mission assurance, and configuration management; and improving training and capability retention (passing expertise between generations of systems engineers); and managing aerospace technology development programs. Applications include commercial, military and civil space systems, and commercial and military aircraft systems. This session also covers the topic of risk management in aerospace endeavors including new insights from the successful application of risk management, lessons learned when risk management did not prevent realization of consequences, and managing new risks associated with AI/ML.

      • Jeremiah Finnigan

        Senior Professional Staff, Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory: Senior Professional Staff, Space Exploration Sector, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. B.S. Mathematics, B.S. Electrical Engineering, and M.S. Computer Engineering, University of Maryland; M.S. Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University.

      • Joshua Calkins

        Systems Engineering Manager, Ensign-Bickford Aerospace & Defense (EBAD): Systems Architecture, Product Development, and Firmware Design of electronic and electroexplosive systems for launch vehicle and missile applications. BS Electrical Engineering, University of Connecticut; MS Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas.

    • 13.03 Cost and Schedule Tools, Methods, and Processes

      This session addresses cost and schedule analysis tools, methods, processes, and results including design trades for design concepts and technologies throughout a project's life cycle. Topics addressed include cost or schedule model development, regression analysis and other tools, historical studies addressing trends, databases, government policies, industry training, mission cost analysis, operations and supporting/infrastructure cost, mission portfolio analysis, case histories, lessons learned, process control, and economic and affordability analysis that assesses program/project viability.

      • Stephen Shinn

        NASA Deputy Chief Financial Officer, NASA - Headquarters: Agency Deputy Chief Financial Officer, NASA Headquarters. 25+ years of experience managing cost estimating, budgeting, program planning, and control, parametric modeling, pricing, financial management, scheduling, and earned value management. B.S., The College of New Jersey; M.S., Johns Hopkins University.

      • Eric Mahr

        Senior Project Leader, The Aerospace Corporation: Senior Project Leader, Strategic Assessments & Studies Division, The Aerospace Corporation. Worked on an array of tasks spanning the space mission life cycle, with a primary focus on programmatic assessments of NASA science missions. B.S., Aerospace Engineering, U. of Arizona and M.S., Aerospace Engineering Sciences, U. of Colorado.

    • 13.04 Advances in Conceptual Design Methods and Applications

      This session is dedicated to the discussion of the current state of practice and future advances in conceptual design methods and applications. The goal is to foster the application of Digital Engineering (DE) in conceptual design, concurrent engineering, and collaborative engineering practices across the lifecycle, including advances in team-based systems engineering methods and novel applications of concept design methods. Example topics include MBSE applications, optimization techniques, results visualization, digital twin integration, and trade space exploration.

      • Rob Stevens

        Director of Model Based Systems Engineering Office, Aerospace Corporation: Rob Stevens is the Director of the Model Based Systems Engineering Office at The Aerospace Corporation in El Segundo, California where he has provided systems engineering analysis support for numerous satellite programs, managed the corporation’s Concept Design Center, and served as project systems engineer for several CubeSats in the AeroCube program. Prior to joining The Aerospace Corporation, he served as the Director of the Small Satellite Program at the U.S. Naval Academy, flew as a Naval Flight Officer in E-2C Hawkeyes, and earned his M.S. in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School, and his Ph.D. in Astronautical Engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology.

      • Alfred Nash

        Lead, A-Team, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Dr. Alfred E. Nash is the Leader of the A-Team at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He received his B. S. in Physics from Stanford University and his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

    • 13.05 System Simulation and Verification

      This session addresses the design, implementation, and use of system-level simulations to measure or verify the performance and utility of space, ground, and related systems.

      • Virgil Adumitroaie

        Data Scientist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Past research in high-speed turbulent combustion modeling, data dimensionality reduction, neural networks, signaling pathways, decision support, climate data assimilation, and scientific software development. Currently working on planetary atmospheric and magnetospheric modeling. Adjunct Lecturer at the Viterbi School of Engineering, USC. Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, University at Buffalo.

      • Gregory Falco

        Assistant Professor, Cornell University : Prof. Gregory Falco has been at the forefront of critical infrastructure and space system security in both industry and academia for the past decade. His research entitled Cybersecurity Principles for Space Systems was highly influential in the recent Space Policy Directive-5, which shared the same title. He has been listed in Forbes 30 Under 30 for his inventions and contributions to critical infrastructure cyber security. Falco has been published in Science for his work on cyber risk. He is currently an Assistant Professor at Cornell University. Prof. Falco serves on the Leadership Council for the Maine Spaceport Complex, and as a member of the Department of Homeland Security’s Space Systems Critical Infrastructure Working Group. He is also a Cyber Research Fellow at Harvard University’s Belfer Center, Research Affiliate at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and Postdoctoral Scholar at Stanford University. Falco completed his PhD at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, master’s degree at Columbia University and bachelor’s degree at Cornell University.

    • 13.06 System Verification & Validation and Integration & Test

      This session focuses on the Verification & Validation and Integration & Test processes and case studies for Projects/Flight/Sub systems, and systems of systems.

      • Benjamin Solish

        Systems Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Benjamin Solish is currently the SRL LPCE V&V Systems Engineer. Prior to this role he worked on Psyche, OCO-3, OCO-2, InSight, GRACE-FO, LDSD and the TRaiNED missions. He received his Bachelor of Science Degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his Masters of Science Degree from the University of Washington.

      • Sarah Bucior

        Systems Engineer, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory: Sarah Bucior is currently a Senior I&T Engineer on the IMAP mission set to launch to observe the Sun in Spring 2025. She received a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering Astronautics from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2001 and a MS in Systems Engineering from The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore in 2015. She has been a Flight Controller on the New Horizons mission to Pluto and the STEREO Launch in 2006, and was a Test Conductor for the Van Allen Probes (formerly RBSP) Launch in 2012. She has served as an I&T Engineer for the launches of Parker Solar Probe and DART. She recently delivered the MEGANE Instrument to Japan for their upcoming launch of the MMX spacecraft.

    • 13.07 Strategic Technology Planning, Management & Infusion

      This session addresses strategic planning, research, development, and infusion of innovative technology to meet the future needs of civil space, commercial space, and national security space users. It includes technology strategy and roadmaps, technology maturation, and mission infusion to overcome the valley of death. This session also focuses on opportunities as well as legal and operational challenges as associated with partnerships, technology transfer, commercialization, and recent developments in aerospace startup accelerators for public and private sectors.

      • Theodore Bujewski

        Director, Science and Technology Integration, US Space Force, Department of Defense: TBD

      • Andrea Belz

        Vice Dean, Transformative Initiatives, University of Southern California: Vice Dean of Transformative Initiatives at USC Viterbi School of Engineering and Professor of Practice of Industrial and Systems Engineering. President-Elect of IEEE Technology and Engineering Management Society. Founder of Management in Innovation, Entrepreneurial Research, and Venture Analysis (MINERVA) research group: study public-private partnerships for deep technology companies; collaborate extensively with JPL. Research has been supported by DHS, DOD NSIN, NSF, Aerospace Corp. Previously oversaw $300+ M annual budget in principal applied research programs at National Science Foundation as Division Director; prior to that, Visiting Professor at Caltech. Active angel investor - board member of Caltech spinoff laser company Ondax until its acquisition by Coherent. 10 years consulting to JPL Mission Systems Division and leading pre-Phase A studies. Consultant to: Avery Dennison, BP, Caltech, CVI Melles Griot, HRL, National Academy of Engineering, Occidental Petroleum, Samsung, UCLA, venture capital firms. PhD, physics, Caltech; MBA, finance, Pepperdine University, BS, physics, U. Maryland.

      • Charles Player

        Principal Director, Innovation Laboratory, The Aerospace Corporation: I have worked multiple programs on either end of the aerospace technology development spectrum: concept to first flight, operational deployment, and commercial sales. I have seen first-hand what it takes to transform a technology to a viable commercial product. I have developed an appreciation for the needs of not only a program but also the organization and infrastructure necessary to bridge the chasm from idea to profitable and marketable product. My goal for the second half of my career is to utilize my experience to contribute to teams and organizations that are developing, delivering, and commercializing new aerospace technologies. I have a BS in Aeronautical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, a Masters in Aerospace Engineering, and a Masters of Business Administration from Old Dominion University and The College of William & Mary, respectively. My career has spanned government (NASA Langley Research Center), multiple commercial companies, and I am currently the Principal Director of the Innovation Laboratory at the Aerospace Corporation, an FFRDC.

    • 13.08 Promote (and Provoke!) Cultural Change

      "Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast!" * Culture is a byproduct of habits, and this session explores how to create habits, environments, and nutrients that help great things grow. * Peter Drucker, noted management consultant, educator, and author.

      • David Scott

        NASA Retiree (for the moment), (Self): David W. Scott, alias “Scotty,” is looking for the next adventure after retiring from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in May 2020 after 31 years of civil service His work at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) from 2009-2020 included Human Factors Engineering and Agile development advocacy, requirements and training development, and innovation. He was a Payload Communications Manager for the International Space Station from 1999-2007 and has spearheaded several console technology projects, especially in space-to-ground videoconferencing and audio archiving. He was a payload communicator for the ATLAS-1 Spacelab mission in 1992, and helped design the payload training program for Space Station. From 1985-89 he designed and programmed (good ol' Fortran!) Spacelab crew training simulators for an on-site contractor. He spent 6 years as a U.S. Naval Officer, including flight duty in F-14s, and holds a B.S. in Physics and Mathematics from Principia College.

      • John Ryskowski

        President, JFR Consulting: John Ryskowski is a change catalyst that has helped organizations get un-stuck since 1989. He is particularly interested in the social entanglements that preclude progress as organizations work to create their vision, identify actions, and achieve goals. John holds a MA in Education from California Lutheran College, a BA in Mathematics from California State University Northridge, is a Problem Solving Leadership graduate, a Certified Scrum Master, and a CMMI High Maturity Lead Appraiser for acquisition, services, and development. John is also a yoga practitioner, electric muscle car evangelist, and the creator of Drum-Talks- https://www.drum-talks.com/

    • Richard Mattingly

      Member, Mars Program Formulation Office, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Richard Mattingly is a member of the Mars Program Formulation Office at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), where he was in charge of numerous architectural studies on Mars Sample Return starting in the early 2000’s, currently Chief Engineer for it's Sample Receiving Facility. He has also managed systems engineering groups for JPL's projects implemented in partnership with industry, and instrument and payload development. He has been involved in the formulation and development of many of JPL’s planetary and Earth-orbiting spacecraft and payloads since the 1970’s.

    • 14.01 PANEL: Technology Development for Science-Driven Missions

      Planning for and developing technology is an ongoing process for Planetary Science Missions. The science community and associated technologists are key stakeholders in that process. This panel focuses on a topic of interest each year.

      • Lorraine Fesq

        Chief Technologist, Mission Systems and Operations Division, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Dr. Lorraine Fesq is the Chief Technologist for JPL’s Mission Systems and Operations Division, and the Program Area Manager for Small Bodies and Planetary Defense within JPL’s Planetary Science Directorate. As the recent Program Manager of the ASTERIA CubeSat mission, she demonstrated in-space autonomy experiments. She has over 40 years of experience in industry, government and academia, working all mission phases from formulation to mission operations. Lorraine holds two patents in autonomy, and received a NASA Public Service Medal for her work on the Chandra X-ray Observatory and a NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal for advancing the Fault Management discipline. Lorraine taught at MIT and worked on multiple flight missions at JPL, TRW (now Northrop Grumman), Ball Aerospace and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. She received her B.A. in Mathematics from Rutgers University and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Los Angeles.

    • 14.02 PANEL: Emerging Technologies for Mars Exploration

      This panel will discuss the unique technology needs and recent progress for future Mars exploration, including those for robotics explorers as well as groundbreaking technologies for future human missions. Panelists will highlight a variety of emerging technologies that can enable these future pathways for Mars exploration.

      • Larry Matthies

        Technology Coordinator, Mars Exploration Program, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Dr. Matthies has been at JPL since 1989 and is currently Technology Coordinator in the Mars Exploration Program office. He supervised the JPL Computer Vision Group for 21 years and initiated the development of several computer vision capabilities that have had high impact on Mars missions, including stereo vision and visual odometry for rovers, position and velocity estimation during decent for landers, and visual navigation for helicopters. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, a co-recipient of the 2008 IEEE Technical Field Award in robotics, and a member of the editorial boards of the journals Autonomous Robots and Field Robotics.

    • 14.03 PANEL: Access To Space and Emerging Mission Capabilities

      The high cost of launch continues to be a roadblock to space missions large and small. The development of adapters (ESPA, PPOD, e.g.), the development of new launch vehicles, the acceptance of risk for accommodating secondary or auxiliary payloads, and the explosion of cubesat and smallsat capability have led to some creative approaches to space missions. This panel is meant to showcase how our space colleagues are leveraging these emerging capabilities.

      • Kara O'Donnell

        Principal Director, Aerospace Corporation: Principal Director for the Advanced Research and Engineering at the Aerospace Corporation, providing world class technical support in the areas of adaptive mission assurance, technology planning, development, and test & demonstration.

      • Nicole Fondse

        Systems Director, Aerospace Corporation: Nicole Fondse earned her B. S. in Electrical Engineering and B. S. in Biomedical Engineering from CSU Long Beach in 2005. Upon graduation she joined Northrop Grumman Space Technology. She then earned her M. S. in Systems Engineering and MBA from Loyola Marymount University in 2011. In 2020, Mrs. Fondse transitioned to The Aerospace Corporation where she leads a team supporting the DoD Space Test Program whose responsibility is to provide access to space for military relevant science and technology experiments.

    • 14.04 PANEL: Progress and Plans for the Deep Space Human Exploration Architecture

      NASA has been charged with leading a sustainable program of exploration with commercial and international partners to enable human expansion beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO). Realizing this vision requires advancement of key capabilities and an implementation approach that pulls from the best NASA and the global industry can offer. NASA’s human exploration activities are driving the development of high-priority technologies and capabilities using a combination of unique in-house activities and public-private partnerships to develop and test prototype systems that will form the basis for future human spaceflight missions. This panel will discuss the current plans and status of the NASA exploration programs implementing the deep space architecture including progress toward the first flights of SLS and Orion, development of the Gateway, Human Landing System, and plans for lunar and Mars exploration capabilities.

      • Stephen Creech

        Assistant Deputy Associate Administrator (Technical) Moon to Mars Program ESDMD, NASA - Headquarters: Mr. Creech is the Assistant Deputy Associate Administrator (Technical) for the Moon to Mars Program within ESDMD at NASA HQ

    • 14.05 PANEL : Mars Exploration Science: Mars Sample Return and Beyond

      The panel will present the science of the Mars Exploration Program, which will include the latest discoveries from ongoing missions such as MRO, Curiosity, TGO, and the most recent explorer, InSight. Panel discussion will address questions driving future missions. What do we hope to learn from the next mission, the Mars 2020 Rover, and the samples cached for return to Earth? What is the potential for future missions and the discoveries they could make?

      • Mitch Schulte

        Program Scientist, NASA - Headquarters: Program Scientist, Mars Exploration Program, NASA HQ. Ph.D. Earth and Planetary Sciences, 1997.

    • 14.06 PANEL: NASA’s Earth System Observatory Overview

      NASA’s Earth System Observatory (ESO) is an array of Earth-focused, interconnected satellite missions focused on five study areas: Surface Biology and Geology, Mass Change, Aerosols, Surface Deformation and Change, and Clouds, Convection, and Precipitation. The data gathered from the ESO missions will provide actionable science to inform decisions related to climate change, disaster mitigation, wildfires, and improve real-time agricultural processes, among many other applications. Targeting launch dates in the late 2020s and early 2030s, each satellite in the ESO will deliver its own valued information, but by working as a single observatory, the data and imagery taken together will provide the global community with a 4D, holistic view of Earth, from bedrock to atmosphere. This panel will provide an overview of the ESO; an update on the ESO missions currently in formulation; and how NASA and its partners will make ESO data accessible to users all over the world.

      • Carla Procaccino

        Program Executive, NASA - Headquarters: Carla serves as a Program Executive in NASA's Earth Science Division.

    • 14.07 PANEL: Mars Exploration Program Future Plan

      Over the past two decades NASA and the Mars Exploration Program (MEP) have been making progressive steps to better understand the planet and to search for past and present life at Mars. The Mars Exploration Program is now at an inflection point at which it must adapt to the changing space business environment (i.e., broadening international participation and expanding commercial interest/capability), address critical/aging infrastructure, and prepare for a human presence at Mars. Mars continues to pose key questions that call for a coordinated program of scientific exploration: Explore the Potential for Martian Life, Support Human Exploration of Mars, and Discover Dynamic Mars. Emerging capabilities enable a new era of competitive missions, strengthened infrastructure, transportation opportunities, advanced technologies, and inclusive exploration. This presentation will outline co-equal program science themes, the initiatives for the future of the MEP, and the aspirational timeline for robotic exploration at Mars from present through 2043.

      • Tiffany Morgan

        Mars Exploration Program, Deputy Director, : Tiffany M. Morgan is the Deputy Director of the Mars Exploration Program (MEP) in NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. In this role she provides program leadership in exploring and characterizing Mars to understand its current environment, climate, geological history, biological potential, and to prepare for human exploration. Before joining NASA HQ as the MEP Deputy Director, Tiffany was Project Manager for the Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) Project at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland. She spent over a decade working for Air Force Space Command (now the Space Force) with a focus on rapid space acquisitions including spacecraft missions, satellite command & control systems and Department of Defense (DoD) payloads. Prior to civil service, Tiffany worked for the Army Space and Missile Defense Command at the Reagan Test Site in the Marshall Islands managing optics and radar systems, and held positions in industry with an emphasis on process and systems engineering.

    • 14.08 NASA’s Future Plans in LEO

      In this discussion, panelists will update NASA’s progress and plans for International Space Station operations through 2030 and transition of activities to commercial LEO destinations. The panelists will discuss policy, strategies, and activities for continued presence in LEO, including discussion of the anticipated NASA LEO Microgravity Strategy.

      • Robyn Gatens

        Director, ISS, NASA - Headquarters: Ms. Robyn Gatens is the director of the International Space Station (ISS) in the Space Operations mission directorate at NASA Headquarters. As ISS director, Gatens leads strategy, policy, integration, and stakeholder engagement for the space station program at the agency level, including use of the station for research and technology demonstrations including to support NASA’s Artemis missions, and activities to secure an ongoing U.S. presence in low-Earth orbit (LEO) by enabling a successful, long-term private sector commercial LEO space economy. She also serves as NASA’s liaison to the ISS National Laboratory. Ms. Gatens is the recipient of NASA’s Outstanding Leadership and Exceptional Achievement Medals, and holds a Bachelor of Chemical Engineering degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

    • 14.09 Commercial Services for Space Exploration

      In recent decades, U.S. space companies have developed business models to enable commercial transportation services for space exploration. One notable example is the Launch Services Program (LSP), where entities compete for NASA's launch task orders. LSP missions adhere to NASA's standards, facilitating programs like the Commercial Crew Launch Program for low Earth orbit (LEO). Beyond LEO, the Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) initiative allows companies to compete for orders to transport NASA payloads to cis-lunar space. The goal is for NASA to be a primary, but not exclusive, client for cis-lunar payloads, boosting robotic missions, scientific output, and reducing costs. These savings may enable non-NASA payloads from academia, private sectors, and other agencies, fostering a commercial ecosystem. Discussions will explore commercial service models, draw insights from past programs, and assess ongoing initiatives' commercial viability, including predictions for potential services at Mars and on other deep space exploration programs

      • Greg Chavers

        Strategic Architect and Integration Manager, NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center: Dr. Greg Chavers is the strategic architect and integration manager for science and technology at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Previous roles include Director of the Mars Campaign Office at NASA HQ, Director of the Technical Integration Office at NASA HQ, assistant deputy associate administrator for Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) in NASA’s Exploration Systems Development Mission Directorate and deputy program manager of NASA’s Human Landing System (HLS) Program, and prior to HLS program formulation, he was a lead developer of HLS requirements and government reference architecture. As HLS deputy program manager, Greg was jointly responsible for leading the development of an integrated human lunar landing system for the Artemis program. Dr. Chavers earned his bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering from Auburn University, and his master’s and doctoral degrees in physics from the University of Alabama, Huntsville.

    This Track provides a temporary home for any paper whose authors have not found a session to which the paper clearly belongs. The Technical Committee may suggest a session in this conference or may advise the authors to seek a different conference for their work.

    • Karen Profet

      Retired, Aerospace Corporation: Project Engineer, MILSATCOM Division, The Aerospace Corporation (retired). BA, Physics, UC, Berkeley.

    • Richard Mattingly

      Member, Mars Program Formulation Office, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Richard Mattingly is a member of the Mars Program Formulation Office at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), where he was in charge of numerous architectural studies on Mars Sample Return starting in the early 2000’s, currently Chief Engineer for it's Sample Receiving Facility. He has also managed systems engineering groups for JPL's projects implemented in partnership with industry, and instrument and payload development. He has been involved in the formulation and development of many of JPL’s planetary and Earth-orbiting spacecraft and payloads since the 1970’s.

    • Erica Deionno

      Principal Director, The Aerospace Corporation: Erica DeIonno received a Ph.D. in Chemistry from UCLA. She is currently a Systems Director in the Innovation Office at The Aerospace Corporation. Prior to her current position, her research included molecular and polymer-based electronic devices, radiation testing and modeling of memristor-based memory devices (RRAM), and solar cell degradation modeling. She has participated in a number of failure analysis studies, including testing of MEMS spatial light modulators and CCD arrays.

    • 16.01 Can`t find a session to submit to? Submit here and we will help

      This is a dummy session intended to accumulate papers that authors don't know to which session their papers belong. These Session Chairs will help place the papers where they belong.

      • Jeffery Webster

        Senior Systems Engineer, retired, NASA / Caltech / Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Retired Senior Systems Engineer. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Project Support Lead-Project Support Office; Mission Systems Concepts Section-Mars Trace Gas Orbiter; Project Planner & Systems Engineering; Associate Engineer, Mission & Systems Concepts Section. Publications and awards available upon request.

      • Erica Deionno

        Principal Director, The Aerospace Corporation: Erica DeIonno received a Ph.D. in Chemistry from UCLA. She is currently a Systems Director in the Innovation Office at The Aerospace Corporation. Prior to her current position, her research included molecular and polymer-based electronic devices, radiation testing and modeling of memristor-based memory devices (RRAM), and solar cell degradation modeling. She has participated in a number of failure analysis studies, including testing of MEMS spatial light modulators and CCD arrays.

      • Richard Mattingly

        Member, Mars Program Formulation Office, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Richard Mattingly is a member of the Mars Program Formulation Office at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), where he was in charge of numerous architectural studies on Mars Sample Return starting in the early 2000’s, currently Chief Engineer for it's Sample Receiving Facility. He has also managed systems engineering groups for JPL's projects implemented in partnership with industry, and instrument and payload development. He has been involved in the formulation and development of many of JPL’s planetary and Earth-orbiting spacecraft and payloads since the 1970’s.